gentleman


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gentleman

Brit History a man of gentle birth, who was entitled to bear arms, ranking above a yeoman in social position

Gentleman

 

(Russian, dzhentl’men). (1) A man of “well-born” origins, a nobleman. This usage is now considered obsolete.

(2) In Great Britain and other English-speaking countries, a man who strictly adheres to the bourgeois “society” rules of behavior and observes so-called good form.

(3) A polite form of address to men in English-speaking countries. In the figurative sense a gentleman is a man who has been well brought up.

References in classic literature ?
Not at all,' said the gentleman in the white waistcoat.
Ten shillings too much,' said the gentleman in the white waistcoat.
No, but I repeat it was one of them who lighted the general and this gentleman to the abbey, and Digby assures us that the general had strong suspicions concerning those people.
Gentlemen, let the most profound silence cover all this with an impenetrable veil; we will detain this gentleman, not from mistrust of him with regard to the crime, but to assure more effectively the secret of the general's absence by keeping among ourselves; therefore, until fresh orders, the gentleman will remain at headquarters.
When the bottle and glasses were on the table the gentleman began to relate the occasion of the preceding disturbance.
Indeed, half his natural flow of animal spirits, joined to the sweetness of his temper, was sufficient to make a most amiable companion; and notwithstanding the heaviness of his heart, so agreeable did he make himself on the present occasion, that, at their breaking up, the young gentleman earnestly desired his further acquaintance.
Bring him along,' said the gentleman, pointing to the house.
Barnaby and his mother walked on, on either side of the gentleman on horseback, who surveyed each of them from time to time in a proud and coarse manner, and occasionally thundered out some question, the tone of which alarmed Barnaby so much that he could find no answer, and, as a matter of course, could make him no reply.
I knew, just as sure as I was standing there on one leg, that this was the sort of girl who would have me and Gentleman out of that house about three seconds after the clergyman had tied the knot.
Here the old gentleman got out and helped out the old lady, and then took from under the seat a nosegay resembling in shape and dimensions a full-sized warming-pan with the handle cut short off.
The fair gentleman, seeing the signs of bad weather, desired to remain in Mr.
Pickwick's reach, had not its course been providentially stopped, just as that gentleman was on the point of resigning it to its fate.