geographic range

geographic range

[¦jē·ə¦graf·ik ′rānj]
(geodesy)
The extreme distance at which an object or light can be seen when limited only by the curvature of the earth and the heights of the object and the observer.
References in periodicals archive ?
In most branches of medicine, such positive developments might reasonably be expected to translate smoothly into more providers, a wider geographic range of services and increased accessibility for patients.
Schuck says there was never any question that his company would need more space and geographic range.
Its client base spans a wide geographic range that extends from Europe to Japan, Australia and the USA.
It is certainly possible to quarrel with some of the particulars of Wiesner-Hanks's argument; no study that condenses such a vast temporal and geographic range of materials and analytical instruments for dealing with them could hope to be immune from such criticism.
In a multibillion-dollar industry that runs on fractions of ratings points with analysts pinpointing listeners according to what model car they drive, terrestrial radio works by identifying a broad target audience and aiming straight at its core, within the limited geographic range of the station's signal.
For each species listed, information is given about its conservation status, geographic range, and type of preferred habitat.
On the other hand, mammals requiring large tracts of undisturbed prairie appear to be contracting in geographic range in Nebraska.
It has similarly grand dimensions as the author's previous monumental work, Conquest: Montezuma, Cortes, and the Fall of Old Mexico, though here the chronological and geographic range is much greater.
The geographic range is smaller than that suggested by the titular phrase "Latin American"; all the authors are from Spanish-speaking South American countries.
Thus, Islamic Art covers a slightly narrower temporal and geographic range than its title would otherwise imply.
For instance, an improvement of even one or two degrees Fahrenheit in temperature tolerance would significantly expand the geographic range of these crops to new regions, as well as dramatically improve the year-to-year consistency of yields where the crops are currently grown.
Although few in number, the plight of these trees represents most of the causes of species decline: habitat loss or alteration, introduced diseases and pests, commercial exploitation and development, over-collecting, and a naturally small geographic range.

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