Georgics

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Georgics

Roman Vergil’s poetic statement set in context of agriculture. [Rom. Lit.: Benét, 389]
See: Farming
References in periodicals archive ?
11) For its careful attention to the work of the georgic in the poem, Wallace's study deserves more than mere mention here, particularly where she reads "gender against the genres which metaphorize art as 'labor'" and turns for illumination to what she refers to as the "sotto voce genres of georgic and its early nineteenth-century extension, peripatetic" (225).
29) Vergil, it seems, refers to this Eclogue in the third Georgic, line 16: in medio mihi Caesar erit.
The opening lines of book 1 "stress georgic colonial endeavor" (118) chiefly because of the words plaine and fielde, terms that are worried for several paragraphs in what passes for close, but is really forced, reading.
The Georgic II was the last ship built for the White Star Line in 1931 for the Atlantic run and ended her life as a troopship.
45) Virgil dedicates all four Georgics to Maecenas, but the first lengthy and heartfelt dedication comes in the second Georgic, in which Bacchus and viticulture are prominently featured.
The third Georgic is devoted to animal husbandry and contains a section on veterinary medicine.
The contemporary environmental conflict between those who work the land for profit and professional environmentalists who want to remove land from the market is inherent in the imagined dispute between shepherds and farmers, pastoral and georgic.
In its depiction of labour and race relations in the contemporary rural context, this novel is selfconsciously georgic in nature--that is, instead of withdrawing from history by eliding the relations which have fashioned South African history, this novel's use of the pastoral foregrounds these relations.
Tacconi; "Placement, Gender, Pedagogy: Virgil's Fourth Georgic in Print" by Andrew Wallace; and "Montaigne on Property, Public Service, and Political Servitude" by Constance Jordan.
The Satisfactions of the Mad Farmer" concludes a Whitmanesque catalogue of georgic pleasures with a stanza that announces a theology very much at odds with conventional Christianity:
Ammons, John Ashbery and others; and even certain postmodernist revivals of the obsolete long-poem genre of the georgic (Charles Olson's Maximus poems, Ginsberg's The Fall of America, Gary Snyder's Mountains and Rivers without End).