geosynchronous orbit


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geosynchronous orbit

(jee-oh-sink -rŏ-nŭs) An Earth orbit made by an artificial satellite (moving west to east) that has a period of 24 hours, equal to the Earth's period of rotation on its axis. If the orbit is inclined to the equatorial plane the satellite will appear from Earth to trace out a figure-of-eight, once per day, between latitudes corresponding to the angle of orbital inclination to the equator. If the 24-hour orbit lies in the equatorial plane, and is circular, the satellite will appear from Earth to be almost stationary; the orbit and orbiting body are then termed geostationary. A geostationary orbit has an altitude of 36 000 km.

A geosynchronous or geostationary orbit is very difficult to achieve, requiring a very high orbital velocity. Satellites in such orbits are used for communications and navigation and also for certain types of Earth observations. Most communications satellites are now geostationary, with groups of three or more, spaced around the orbit, giving global coverage.

geosynchronous orbit

[‚jē·ō¦siŋ·krə·nəs ′ȯr·bət]
(aerospace engineering)
A satellite orbit that has a period of one sidereal day (23 hours, 56 minutes, 4 seconds). Abbreviated GEO.
References in periodicals archive ?
Most of the United States' assets in space for national security are in geosynchronous orbit.
When fully operational, SBIRS High will comprise two payloads in highly elliptical orbit (HEO), four satellites in geosynchronous orbit (GEO), as well as fixed and mobile ground-based assets to receive and process the infrared data.
Lockheed Martin has achieved a major milestone with completion and delivery of a sophisticated, high-performance communications subsystem integral to the infrared payload of the first Space-Based Infrared System High (SBIRS High) geosynchronous orbit (GEO) satellite.
This is the most powerful version of the Atlas rocket family, with a lift capability ranging up to 19,100 pounds to geosynchronous orbit.
with operations based at Sea Launch Home Port in Long Beach Harbor, the multinational partnership provides commercial satellite customers the most direct and cost-effective route to geosynchronous orbit.
Hughes Space and Communications Company is the world's leading manufacturer of geosynchronous orbit communications satellites and has built nearly 40% of those in operations today.
All were boosted into geosynchronous orbit by Boeing-built IUS booster rockets.
New Skies has five satellites in geosynchronous orbit and ground facilities around the world.
The first Titan IV launch this year was February 7 carrying the Defense Department's first Milstar satellite into geosynchronous orbit 22,300 miles above Earth.
The first was launched February 7 carrying the Defense Department's first Milstar satellite into geosynchronous orbit 22,300 miles above Earth.
In July 1963, the Hughes-built Syncom using the Williams invention became the first satellite to operate successfully in the geosynchronous orbit.
by a Russian Proton SL-12 rocket is stationed in a geosynchronous orbit at 142.