geothermometer


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geothermometer

[¦jē·ō·thər′mäm·əd·ər]
(engineering)
A thermometer constructed to measure temperatures in boreholes or deep-sea deposits.
(geology)
A mineral that yields information about the temperature range within which it was formed. Also known as geologic thermometer.
References in periodicals archive ?
An experimentally derived kinetic model for smectite-toillite conversion and its use as a geothermometer.
Karingithi [24] believed that using Na-K geothermometer is not appropriate for waters with high calcium concentration and reservoir temperature of less than 150[degrees]C and high concentrations of magnesium lead to unusual high temperatures in Na-K-Ca-Mg geothermometer.
1993, An empirical oxygen- and hydrogen-isotope geothermometer for quartz-tourmaline and tourmaline-water: Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta, v.
In this study, temperature of the hydrothermal aquifer has been evaluated by using geothermometers methods through Aquachem Program (Calmbach, 1997) and tabulated in Table (2).
It then reviews various igneous geothermometers and geobarometers, and examines the issue of disequilibrium.
Based upon the mineral parageneses and chemical compositions of minerals (wet chemical analysis of garnet, biotite, and amphibole monomineral fractions) and the use of different geothermometers and geobarometers, the peak metamorphic conditions in main structural zones of the Estonian basement were estimated (Koppelmaa et al.
Using the chemistry of key peridotite minerals as geothermometers, Bonatti estimated the rocks' temperatures as they rose through the mantle to the surface.
Correspondingly high silica geothermometers indicate that the parent geothermal reservoir water is in reasonably close proximity to the sample location.
A set of mercury-in-glass geothermometers with bent stems (Hongxing Thermal Instruments, Wuqiang County, Hebei Province, China) were placed in the middle of the furrow in every treatment plot at soil depths of 5, 10, 15, and 20cm.
Na-K and Na-K-Ca geothermometers commonly used to predict source water temperature are in close agreement and suggest a deep reservoir with temperatures of 200-240 degrees C.
Magmatic temperatures of 895-910[degrees]C were obtained from coexisting pyroxenes using two separate geothermometers (Wood and Banno 1973; Wells 1978).