bog

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bog,

very old lake without inlet or outlet that becomes acid and is gradually overgrown with a characteristic vegetation (see swampswamp,
shallow body of water in a low-lying, poorly drained depression, usually containing abundant plant growth dominated by trees, such as cypress, and high shrubs. Swamps develop in moist climates, generally in such places as low-lying coastal plains, floodplains of rivers,
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). Peat moss, or sphagnumsphagnum
or peat moss,
any species of the large and widely distributed genus Sphagnum, economically the most valuable moss. Sphagnums, the principal constituent of peat, typically grow as a floating mat on freshwater bogs.
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, grows around the edge of the open water of a bog (peatpeat,
soil material consisting of partially decomposed organic matter, found mainly in swamps and bogs in various parts of the northern temperate zone but also in some semitropical and tropical regions.
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 is obtained from old bogs) and out on the surface. With its continued growth, the moss forms a mat on the water in which other bog plants find a foothold, and humus and soil are slowly built up on the body of the water. Because of this formation bogs are sometimes treacherous (quaking bogs shake under the weight of a man) and have occasionally resulted in fatalities when a man or animal breaks through the vegetative crust. Because of their extreme acidity, bogs form a natural preservative and have been found to be a valuable repository of animals and plants of earlier times. Typical bog plants of today include, besides sphagnum, many orchids, the pitcher plant, the sundew, and the cranberry (old bogs are utilized for cranberry cultivation). Because of the reclamation of old bog lands by drainage and by their natural filling in, bogs in America are becoming rare, and with them their unique flora and fauna. One example of the latter is the bog turtle, Clemmys muhlenbergi, a tiny animal with a black, sculptured shell and orange head markings. The bog turtle has disappeared from most of its original habitat in the middle Atlantic states. Another consequence of the drainage and filling of bogs is the decreased water-holding capacity of the land, resulting in rapid run-off during rains and the increased siltation of rivers and streams.

bog

[bäg]
(ecology)
A plant community that develops and grows in areas with permanently waterlogged peat substrates. Also known as moor; quagmire.

bog

Wet, soft, and spongy ground, where the soil is composed mainly of decayed and decaying vegetable matter.

bog

Describes the undercarriage getting stuck in soft ground while taxiing. “The aircraft has bogged down in the mud.”

bog

wet spongy ground consisting of decomposing vegetation, which ultimately forms peat
References in periodicals archive ?
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Obviously struggling to accommodate the novelty of three soloists, Beethoven gets bogged down in problems of distribution and structure, and his attempts to solve them seem to take forever.
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