shut

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shut

the line along which pieces of metal are welded
References in periodicals archive ?
Johnson reveals, AoMy parents were dealing with evictions and repossessions and electricity getting shut off, and I just realized I had to get it together.
We hit him up for whatever pools he could take us to without getting shut out of the scene, ditches that were around.
Staring at the prospect of getting shut out for the fifth time this month, the Dodgers rallied for two runs in the eighth inning and two more in the ninth to tie the score.
After Valtteri Filppula put the top-seeded Red Wings ahead 4-0, Brenden Morrow scored with a minute left in the second period to prevent the fifth-seeded Stars from getting shut out.
Ireland have found to their cost against the likes of Georgia that when they are trying to get the ball out wide to the likes of Brian O'Driscoll he is just getting shut out.
And despite getting shut out of this year's nominations for its chart-topping follow-up album, "The Open Door," band leader Amy Lee was on the short list of rock stars on hand to announce the 2006 nominations in Los Angeles last week.
The Ravens, Patriots and Bears winning were all expensive and three teams getting shut out was bad news as we refund all money line bets on teams who fail to score.
We're starting to get worried that the editorial people have a better sense of the other guy and that we run the risk of getting shut out.
On top of that there's some keeping-it-real sub-plots about drugs, bad homes and community centres getting shut down.
In this case, they had a problem that their Web sites kept getting shut down, so someone said, 'Let's make this a bit more untraceable,' and the way to do that was to host it, or appear to host it, on third-party systems," Stewart says.
Maybe the smart guys will figure out the cost of a few more days' worth of goods beats the chances of getting shut out by delivery interruptions -- natural or man-made.
A recent UCLA national study found the median parental income of incoming college freshmen increased more than twice as fast as the median income of all families with children in the eighties, a clear sign that students from less affluent families were again getting shut out of higher education.