geyser


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Wikipedia.
Related to geyser: Fly Geyser, Old Faithful Geyser

geyser

(gī`zər) [Icel.], hot spring from which water and steam are ejected periodically to heights ranging from a few to several hundred feet. Notable geysers are found in Iceland, New Zealand, and W United States, which are areas of recent volcanic activity. Geyser action in Iceland was studied by the German chemist R. W. BunsenBunsen, Robert Wilhelm
, 1811–99, German scientist, educated at the Univ. of Göttingen, where he received his doctorate in 1830. He served on the faculties of several universities and was at Heidelberg from 1852 to 1889.
..... Click the link for more information.
, whose explanation of it (1847) is generally accepted. Water, mainly from rainfall, is heated by absorbing hot gases or by contact with hot rocks. If it flows into a crooked tube or fissure in the ground, the heat fails to circulate by convection and is concentrated in one section of the tube, located well below the surface. Here the water may be superheated without boiling because of the pressure of the colder water above. When at last it does turn to steam it raises the upper part of the column of water, causing it to overflow. This reduces the pressure on the water below, a great deal is abruptly converted into steam, and the whole column—steam and water—is forced to erupt. Geyser activity is influenced by earth tides, which are caused by the moon's gravitational pull on the earth. Geysers often build cones of opaline silica called geyserite around their vents. "Old Faithful" in Yellowstone Park usually erupts at intervals of about 66 min, but it has become less regular in recent years. Mud geysers or mud volcanoes are eruptive mud springs. Geothermal generating plants, notably in California and New Zealand, use geysers to produce electricity. Geyserlike eruptions have been observed by the space probe Cassini on Enceladus, one of the moons of Saturn.

Bibliography

See G. A. Waring, Thermal Springs of the United States and Other Countries of the World (rev. ed. 1965); T. S. Bryan, Geysers (2005).

geyser

[′gī·zər]
(hydrology)
A natural spring or fountain which discharges a column of water or steam into the air at more or less regular intervals.

instantaneous-type water heater

instantaneous-type water heater
A heater in which there is an exceedingly rapid increase in water temperature as the water flows through tubes surrounding an electric heating coil; best suited for applications requiring a continuous flow of hot water. Must be used with care when the demand is low because accurate temperature control at low flow rates usually is poor.

geyser

a spring that discharges steam and hot water
References in periodicals archive ?
Follow-up observations of Jupiter's icy moon failed to confirm the existence of powerful geysers observed by the Hubble Space Telescope in 2012, researchers reported December 19 at a meeting of the American Geophysical Union.
ISLAMABAD -- Gas water geysers without a device 'conical baffles' consumes more gas and increase gas bills.
TEHRAN (FNA)- A team of scientists using mission data from NASA's Cassini spacecraft identified 101 distinct geysers erupting on Saturn's icy moon Enceladus.
When the researchers compared the geysers' locations with low-resolution maps of thermal emission, it became apparent the greatest geyser activity coincided with the greatest thermal radiation.
Geyser will have responsibility for all operations in the region.
You want geysers shooting superheated water and steam hundreds of feet into the air?
Unlike the park's popular and famous Old Faithful geyser, which spews water like clockwork every hour-and-a-half, no one knows when Steamboat will erupt next.
The most obvious way to produce geysers is to have boiling liquid [inside the moon]," Ingersoll says.
Back matter covers the numbers of active and extinct geysers in each country, a description of shapes and eruptions, and includes a map pinpointing locations.
Travelers who throng to the Upper Geyser Basin often miss the Biscuit Basin, a short drive away.
The park's Norris Geyser Basin, at 7,000 feet, has an exceptional blend of the three ingredients that are key to forming geysers: abundant water, intense heat, and water and pressure-tight underground plumbing.