giant branch

giant branch

[¦jī·ənt ′branch]
(astronomy)
A grouping of stars on the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram that extends upwards and to the right of the main sequence; it represents the first stage of giant-star evolution in which hydrogen fuses to helium in a shell surrounding the core where hydrogen fusion has been exhausted.
References in periodicals archive ?
Jean froze in horror as a giant branch of a mighty aged oak split from its bark.
Abstract: The asymptoic giant branch star R Sculptoris is surrounded by a detached shell of dust and gas.
The first conference, held in 2006, was subtitled "Their Importance as Actors and Probes," and the subtitle of the second is meant to reflect how new instruments will soon allow both a closer look at individual rather nearby stars, and investigate the bright asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars in external systems.
Sophie Howard, pictured here for the first time, was with friends when the giant branch fell from a 50ft tree.
Nevertheless, it seemed better to me that they shouldn't be flogged off for I feared an eventual loosening of whatever rules and regulations might be imposed so that, in time, we'd find ourselves banned from any dappled glade that didn't contain a giant branch of Tesco.
Arab Bank has established branches in the Arab World and major global financial centers with a giant branch network spread out in 28 countries spanning five continents.
An August 2006 conference demonstrated the relevance of asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars and stellar astrophysics as a whole for the understanding of galactic structure and evolution.
The ten-foot-wide hole lay under the giant branch of a red mangrove tree.
If I had grafted his giant branch onto Friedrich's tree, I could also, for this occasion, turn him into a twentieth-century manifestation of what, rightly or wrongly, has been considered an indigenous American phenomenon, Luminism.
The smaller supply of neutrons found in the helium shell of bloated, elderly stars known as asymptotic giant branch stars prompts "slow" capture, in which atoms absorb neutrons at a slower rate.
Her work resulted in confirmation that dust condensation around Asymptotic Giant Branch (AGB) stars follows the predicted thermodynamic equilibrium pathway.