gibbous phase

gibbous phase

(gĭb`əs): see phasephase,
in astronomy, the measure of how much of the illuminated surface of a planet or satellite can be seen from a point at a distance from that body; the term is most often used to describe the moon as seen from the earth.
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, in astronomy.
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References in periodicals archive ?
The Moon was at a waxing gibbous phase, less than four days from full, so any effect would have to be glimpsed against a brilliant sunlit surface.
7, and it will be at a rather bright waning gibbous phase several nights later, seriously hampering observation of the peak of the Perseids, predicted to occur on the night of Aug.
This means that the period around full moon and the two days before and after when the gibbous phase is particularly brilliant are the favoured hunting win-dow periods to catch them.
30am on 13/14 December, but notes that the moon is in the Waxing Gibbous phase, which may interfere with viewing.
Observation of the large gibbous phase at the start of this elongation will be favourable, as early indications from 2013 May onwards have already shown, but when the planet reaches greatest elongation on 2013 Nov 1 it will be in extreme south declination.
Its gibbous phase thickens to 83% lit, while its apparent diameter shrinks from 14 1/2" to 12 1/2".
The moon will probably spoil much of the event this time around, because it's in gibbous phase and will illuminate 85 percent of the night sky, Space.
The large gibbous phase is therefore often under-observed, yet records of this phase are those most easily able to define the shape and extent of the characteristic, large Y- and psi-shaped dark markings which can almost always be seen in the ultraviolet and glimpsed--in part at least--in white light.
Over the course of the month, the width of its disk grows modestly from 11 to 13 arcseconds, and the strongly gibbous phase is obvious in small telescopes.
0 as its gibbous phase increases from 63% to 74% sunlit and its disk shrinks from 18" to 15".
com pointed out, the moon is in a waxing gibbous phase, which could result in a lot of light across the night sky, making it hard to see the meteor shower during its early peak hours.
Its initially high northerly declination enabled observations of the large gibbous phase, and several repeated observations of the dark markings were made, showing the four-day period well in evidence.