gill raker

gill raker

[′gil ‚rāk·ər]
(vertebrate zoology)
One of the bony processes on the inside of the branchial arches of fishes which prevents the passage of solid substances through the branchial clefts.
References in periodicals archive ?
To distinguish the Mississippi silversides from the local native atherinopsids and to confirm their specific identity in the genus Menidia, scale and gill raker counts were taken according to Hubbs and Lagler (2004) with the following clarification for lateral line scale counts.
Gill raker counts include rudiments and only a total count is given as it is difficult to determine which gill raker is at the angle.
This paper deals with the small ossicles such as bony platelets, scutes, tubercles, prickles, ossified sensory line segments, oral and branchial denticles and ossified gill raker tubercles of the cottoid families Cyclopteridae and Liparidae of the Baltic Sea.
Other characters were tested with the Kruskal-Wallis test and, with the exception of gill raker length, all differed significantly between 2 or more species (Table 5).
Based on correlations of vertebral and gill raker dimensions with the total length for Recent C.
Measurements were made on 31 morphological characters, including standard length, which generally followed those described by Nakabo (2002a) except for the following: body depth 1 and 2 as defined by Kai and Nakabo (2002); upper peduncle length, lower peduncle length, spinous dorsal-fin base length, soft dorsal-fin base length, prepelvic length, and gill raker length as defined by Chen (1971); body width was taken as the distance between the uppermost bases of the right and left pectoral fins; pelvic-to-anal-fin length was taken as the distance from the anteriormost base of the pelvic fin to the origin of the anal fin.
The methods of counting and measuring are as follows: dorsal and anal rays--the last ray of the anal and second dorsal fins is divided at the base and counted as a single ray; gill raker count--number of gill rakers on the first branchial arch.
Among morphometric characters of specimens with all characters, snout length, suborbital depth, gill raker length, body depth at analfin origin, body depth at anal-fin insertion, dorsal-fin spine 1 length, dorsal-fin spine 4 length, pectoral-fin ray length, pelvic-fin ray length, pelvic-fin spine length, anal-fin spine 1 length, anal-fin spine 2 length, anal-fin spine 3 length, preanal length, and soft-dorsal-fin base length differed significantly between S.
Gill raker counts are from the first gill arch (usually on the right side), and the raker at the angle is included in the lower-limb count; rudimentary gill rakers, with the diameter of their bases greater than their height, are defined as tubercles or short rakers.
The upper limb gill raker count is given first; the raker at the angle is included in the lower limb count.
Gill raker counts were made on the first gill arch and include rudiments.
Gill raker structure does not provide significant insight into the possible feeding modes of these various planktivorous fish.