gingival sulcus


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gingival sulcus

[′jin·jə·vəl ′səl·kəs]
(anatomy)
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These inflammatory processes play an imperative role in the progression of periodontal disease and subsequent increase in the gingival sulcus depth and bone loss.
i) The majority of the studies used paper strips which were considered to be more efficient in GCF collection because they could be inserted easily into gingival sulcus or periodontal pockets, as well as for their ability to absorb fluids.
5) The examiners used a Williams SE manual periodontal probe (1, 2, 3, 5, 7, 8, 9, and 10 mm), which was introduced into the interior of the gingival sulcus following the length of the tooth until resistance was felt by the penetrating probe.
Grasp the brush and place it so that the bristles are at a 45-degree angle with the tips of the bristles directed straight into the gingival sulcus (the space between the attached gum and tooth).
Gingivitis is an inflammation of the gums that is caused when plaque bacteria accumulate on the tooth surface and in small pockets at the gumline called the gingival sulcus.
The human gingival epithelial cells (HGECs) lining the gingival sulcus respond to perturbation by microbes of dental plaque by releasing a wide range of cytokines.
A periodontal abscess is defined as: "An acute, destructive process in the periodontium resulting in localised collections of pus communicating with the oral cavity through the gingival sulcus or other periodontal sites and not arising from the tooth pulp" [6].
2] was significantly higher in gingival sulcus fluid in 48 mothers of PLBW infants than in controls (Ann.
Chlorhexidine is delivered from the chip into the gingival sulcus at a concentration above 125 [micro]g/ml for at least seven days.