gingko tree

gingko tree

[′giŋ·kō ‚trē]
(botany)
References in classic literature ?
One huge gingko tree, topping all the others, shot its great limbs and maidenhair foliage over the fort which we had constructed.
95) tells how it would feel to be up a gingko tree in china, a baobab in Africa, or a cypress tree in Mexico among others.
The Norwegian firm was boosted by sale in July 2014 of a49% stake in three UK wind farmstotalling 142MW to Gingko Tree Investment.
In March 2014, Breevast and Immobel sold the first part of the project to German Hannover Leasing and Chinese state fund Gingko Tree Investment for EUR 330 million.
While there has not yet been any sovereign wealth investment in Birmingham from the Far East, Chinese investors Gingko Tree Group recently took a 49 per cent stake in the Co-op headquarters building in Manchester, which could well be a sign of the times, signalling further overseas ownership in key regional cities across the next 12 months.
Another example was Gingko Tree Investment Ltd, a unit of China's State Administration of Foreign Exchange, which invested more than $1.
The first tree planted was a Gingko tree, the national tree of China to mark the partnership between Peel and the Sam Wa Group who they are working with on the International Trade Centre plan for the nearby dockland.
Gingko biloba: extracted from the Gingko tree native to Southeast Asia, gingko biloba has been used in traditional Chinese medicine for centuries.
It was especially Goethe's poem on the Gingko tree (in which he talks about the oneness of two allegedly separate parts of one leaf) that released her creative energy to master this form, which she contends should not be interpreted as a copy of Korean moon jars (Korean: dal hangari).
The bank is to sell a 40 per cent stake in the company to a Chinese investment company, Gingko Tree Investment Ltd.
The discovery revealed that the insects called Thrips lived during the dinosaur age and had dusted themselves with hundreds of pollen grains from a gingko tree.
The gingko tree can grow to a height of over 50 metres, can live for over 1000 years (Mills 2000), is highly tolerant to pollution, urbanisation and cold weather, and is extremely resistant to common environmental enemies like insects, bacteria, viruses and fungi (Curtis-Prior 1999, Oken 1998).