glacial advance

glacial advance

[¦glā·shəl əd′vans]
(geology)
Increase in the thickness and area of a glacier.
A time period equal to that increase.
References in periodicals archive ?
The age of these Jefferson mammoth remains suggests that this species inhabited the Saginaw Bay region of central Michigan in the interstaclial, icefree interval immediately prior to the late Wisconsin glacial advance.
2005, Younger Dryas glacial advance in the southern Gulf of Lawrence, Canada; analogue for ice inception?
While most if not all of Vancouver Island was covered by glacial ice during the most recent glacial advance, it is possible that these endemic taxa survived the glacial maximum on the unglaciated coastal margin that was exposed due to lower sea levels, but is now below the present sea level.
However, during times of peak glacial advance, the inhabitable latitudinal span of North America was tightly constricted.
Objective: The Earth s surface has been dominated by cycles of glacial advance for more than two million years.
It's also a cautionary tale for those who rely almost exclusively on cycles of glacial advance and retreat to study sea-level changes.
Not only did the last glacial advance dump uranium-bearing rocks there, but it also scraped away covering materials in some areas--bringing bedrock closer to the surface -- and increased soil porosity.
After the glacial advance peaked 18,000 years ago, says Soffer, classic Venus figurines were replaced at these sites by more abstract female forms and an abundance of painted signs on mammoth bones and skulls.
Our research indicates the extra snowfall from monsoonal effects can only take credit for up to 30 percent of the glacial advance," he added.
During the intervening colder, much drier events which usually lasted only a few centuries, mean annual temperatures were around 0-2 [degrees] C, close to values for the preceding glacial advance (Guiot et al.