glacial deposit


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Financial.

glacial deposit

[¦glā·shəl di′päz·ət]
(geology)
Material carried to a point beyond its original location by a glacier.
References in periodicals archive ?
At that time glacial deposits in northeastern Illinois were breached, causing a great flood known as the Kankakee Torrent.
However, the third dimension of glacial deposits cannot be mapped by conventional geological methods; expensive drilling and geophysical techniques must be used.
If glacial deposits ever existed on Salisbury Plain, they cannot have escaped incorporation into the terrace sediments.
Following widespread dismissal of Agassiz's controversial claim to have discovered glacial deposits in the Amazon in 1866, the idea fell out of favour.
Older glacial deposits such as Illinoian tills typically have higher hydraulic conductivities than younger deposits such as Wisconsinan tills.
In Michigan, there is an added layer of complexity because most of the bedrock geologic units are overlain by Quaternary glacial deposits.
This was done through a spatial study of the Asylum Lake property composed of two data runs with station spacing of 100-25 meters to help determine bed rock depths and thickness of the overlying glacial deposits.
It consists of Diamictite glacial deposits (TBI), wash out plain deposits (TB2) and followed by subaqueous Diamictite facies (TB3).
To the south, the River Wiske once flowed into the Tees, but was diverted by glacial deposits and now flows south into the Swale.
Later, as we glide through seemingly bottomless waters, the brilliance of the sky matches the blueness of the pools on our decks, and narrow inlets shine green with glacial deposits.
During construction, quality control was key and Mr Ericsson travelled to watch the excavation of the glacial deposits near Tamworth which would create the final exposed concrete to ensure consistency and colour.
Scientists have suggested that over 6,000 years ago, a sharp sea-level rise, attributed to a changing climate and a rapid melting of ice, added weight to the submarine glacial deposits at the edge of the Norwegian continental shelf, destabilising them and causing a 300km long landslide.