glacial epoch


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glacial epoch

[¦glā·shəl ′ep·ək]
(geology)
Any of the geologic epochs characterized by an ice age; thus, the Pleistocene epoch may be termed a glacial epoch.
Generally, an interval of geologic time which was marked by a major equatorward advance of ice; the term has been applied to an entire ice age or (rarely) to the individual glacial stages which make up an ice age.
References in periodicals archive ?
Washington, March 3 (ANI): In a new study, German and Russian climate researchers have found that there were at least two short warming periods in the transition between the last interglacial and glacial epochs, around 115,000 years ago.
But the newer evidence of worldwide temperature shifts has convinced Broecker that the tropical ocean might represent a critical and as-yet-overlooked force of change during the glacial epochs.
When the rest of the globe turned frosty during the last ice age, some 115,000 to 10,000 years ago, Earth's midsection seemed to weather the glacial epoch with little or no cooling.
First of all this is confirmed by the fact that the last three glacial epochs, Dnieper (Mindel), Sozh (Riss), and Poozerian (Wurm), which are reflected in the modern surface, are represented here (Matveev et al.
Walker and Knoll's model indicates that the burial of carbonwas also key to the onset of two other glacial epochs, one at 700 million years ago and the other at about 2 million years ago.
The findings raise concern because scientists had long thought that interglacial spans -- such as the current one -- were immune from the unstable climate swings that characterize glacial epochs.
During glacial epochs, iron-rich dust blowing off the arid continents could have caused a continual fertilization, thus cooling the world, he explains.
For nearly 2 million years, Earth has been moving to the rhythm of the ice ages, bopping back and forth between long glacial epochs and short, balmy spans known as interglacials.