glacial ice

glacial ice

[¦glā·shəl ′īs]
(hydrology)
Ice that is flowing or that exhibits evidence of having flowed.
References in periodicals archive ?
It existed until 5-6,000 BC, but was then gradually flooded by melting glacial ice and geological activity.
A glacial ice sheet more than a mile thick extended from Canada to the northern half of the U.
According to various studies, Pakistan is home to more than 7,000 known glaciers and it has more glacial ice than anywhere else on the planet outside of the Polar Regions.
The researchers predicted an increase in rock avalanches due to the shrinking glacial ice as well as changes in the geometry of the underlying bedrock--an especially troubling finding given not only the presence of the railway tunnel, but also a number of buildings located on the glacier above the bedrock.
But if the ice breaks off and leaves Larson C unstable, then huge amounts of glacial ice could be released into the ocean, contributing to sea level rise.
Similarly, increase in temperatures results in melting of glacial ice and:flooding occurs.
OMG's five-year mission is to monitor the contributing factors to the rising sea level by collecting measurements of the water surrounding glaciers and comparing their relation to the thinning of the glacial ice.
The slopes of a giant Martian volcano, once covered in glacial ice, may have been home to one of the most recent habitable environments yet found on the Red Planet, according to research led by a geologist from Brown University, Providence, R.
Global warming began 18,000 years ago as the earth started warming its way out of the Pleistocene Ice Age--a time when much of North America, Europe, and Asia lay buried beneath great sheets of glacial ice.
Her language is cool and clean and strong, like glacial ice.