glacial maximum


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glacial maximum

[¦glā·shəl ′mak·sə·məm]
(geology)
The time or position of the greatest extent of any glaciation; most frequently applied to the greatest equatorward advance of Pleistocene glaciation.
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For example, the date as well as the impact of the connection of the Mediterranean with the Black Sea after the Late Glacial Maximum has recently been strongly debated and currently no consensus has been reached (cf.
This is a key observation, as large cats have suffered severe range contractions since the last glacial maximum, whereas wolves and bears have ranges that remain similar to their Pleistocene ranges," he said.
The data imply that major population expansions took place after the Last Glacial Maximum (the peak of the last ice age) but before the Neolithic period.
The early onset of pottery making meant that food preparation intensified during the last glacial maximum," says Harvard University archaeologist and study coauthor Ofer Bar-Yosef.
Among the topics are whether the Early Aurignacian in Central Europe represents the initial dispersion of anatomically modern humans in Europe, archaeological and palaeoecological studies of palaeolithic industries before the Last Glacial Maximum between 32,000 and 20,000 ago, whether fishing was an important subsistence activity in the Upper Palaeolithic of Southwest Germany, imprints discovered on palaeolithic ceramics at sites in Lower Austria, and different excavation techniques and their stratigraphic results.
While most if not all of Vancouver Island was covered by glacial ice during the most recent glacial advance, it is possible that these endemic taxa survived the glacial maximum on the unglaciated coastal margin that was exposed due to lower sea levels, but is now below the present sea level.
Results of the palaeobotanical study at the Solova site reflect traces of the first vegetation succession and postglacial tree limit dynamics in Estonia after the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM), giving therefore valuable information not only about a local-scale palaeoenvironment, but also about palaeoclimatological shifts in a regional scale.
However, we live in a warm interval of this ice age--sea level is 120 meters higher than it was at the last glacial maximum 20,000 years ago.
However, during the period of last glacial maximum (LGM), the climate was cold, dry, and inhospitable with frequent storms and a dust-laden atmosphere.