Glare

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glare

[gler]
(communications)
The interference that arises when an attempt is made to place a telephone call just as an incoming call is arriving; in the case of data transmission under the control of a computer, this can render the line or even the computer temporarily inoperative.
(optics)
Discomfort produced in an observer by one or more visible sources of light. Also known as discomfort glare.
Visual disability caused by visible sources or areas of luminance which are in an observer's field of view but do not assist in viewing. Also known as disability glare.
Dazzling brightness of the atmosphere, caused by excessive reflection and scattering of light by particles in the line of sight.

Glare

A state that reduces the ability to perceive the visual information needed for a particular activity. It arises when some parts of the visual field are much brighter than their surroundings.

blinding glare

So intense that for an appreciable length of time after it has been removed, no visual perception is possible.

discomfort glare

Glare that is distracting or uncomfortable, interfering with the perception of visual information required to satisfy biological needs, it does not significantly reduce the ability to see information needed for activities.

direct glare

Results from high luminances directly visible from a viewer’s position.

disability glare

Reduces the ability to perceive the visual information needed for a particular activity.

reflected glare

The reflection of incident light that partially or totally obscures the surface details by reducing the contrast on a surface.

glare

The sensation produced by brightnesses within the visual field that are sufficiently greater than the luminance to which the eyes are adapted to cause annoyance, discomfort, or loss in visual performance and visibility.
References in classic literature ?
exclaimed the five men in one voice, raising themselves on their hands and elbows, and glaring at the speaker.
He saw the walls of the church dimly glaring under the trees beyond.
At this, after a second in which his head made the movement of a baffled dog's on a scent and then gave a frantic little shake for air and light, he was at me in a white rage, bewildered, glaring vainly over the place and missing wholly, though it now, to my sense, filled the room like the taste of poison, the wide, overwhelming presence.
The glaring insincerity of these sermons was not sufficient to compass the banishment of the fashion from the schools, and it is not sufficient to-day; it never will be sufficient while the world stands, perhaps.
The whisper that my master was my father, may or may not be true; and, true or false, it is of but little con- sequence to my purpose whilst the fact remains, in all its glaring odiousness, that slaveholders have ordained, and by law established, that the children of slave women shall in all cases follow the condi- tion of their mothers; and this is done too obviously to administer to their own lusts, and make a grati- fication of their wicked desires profitable as well as pleasurable; for by this cunning arrangement, the slaveholder, in cases not a few, sustains to his slaves the double relation of master and father.
The older a person grows, Harriet, the more important it is that their manners should not be bad; the more glaring and disgusting any loudness, or coarseness, or awkwardness becomes.
Dark handsome new carpets and curtains, an arrangement of some carefully selected antique ornaments in porcelain and bronze, new coverings, and mirrors, and dressing-cases, for the toilet tables, answered the end: they looked fresh without being glaring.
There was Ben Weatherstaff's indignant face glaring at them over the wall from the top of a ladder
cried Saint Antoine, after glaring round for a new means of death; "here is one of his soldiers to be left on guard
These she put down upon the table without a word, glaring at me the while with exemplary firmness, and then retired, locking the door after her.
She looked all round the room in a glaring manner, and then said, leaning on me while her hand twitched my shoulder, "Come, come, come
He was seated across me, glaring at me with his one eye, and in his hand was a knife.