glasnost


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glasnost

(gläs`nōst), Soviet cultural and social policy of the late 1980s. Following his ascension to the leadership of the USSR in 1985, Mikhail GorbachevGorbachev, Mikhail Sergeyevich
, 1931–, Soviet political leader. Born in the agricultural region of Stavropol, Gorbachev studied law at Moscow State Univ., where in 1953 he married a philosophy student, Raisa Maksimovna Titorenko (1932?–99).
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 began to promote a policy of openness in public discussions about current and historical problems. The policy was termed glasnost [openness]. The brutality of the Stalin era, such as the great purges and the KatynKatyn
, village, W central European Russia, 12 mi (19 km) W of Smolensk. During World War II, when it was part of the USSR, it was occupied by the Germans in Aug., 1941.
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 massacre, were acknowledged, and the corruption and stagnation of the BrezhnevBrezhnev, Leonid Ilyich
, 1906–82, Soviet leader. He joined (1931) the Communist party and rose steadily in its hierarchy. In 1952 he became a secretary of the party's central committee.
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 era were sharply criticized. Soviet leaders became more receptive both to the media and to foreign leaders as a new period of detente opened between East and West. Gorbachev hoped that a candidness about the state of the country would accelerate his perestroikaperestroika
, Soviet economic and social policy of the late 1980s. Perestroika [restructuring] was the term attached to the attempts (1985–91) by Mikhail Gorbachev to transform the stagnant, inefficient command economy of the Soviet Union into a decentralized
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 program.

Bibliography

See M. Gorbachev, Perestroika (1988); E. A. Hewett and V. H. Winston, ed., Milestones in Glasnost and Perestroyka (1991).

glasnost

the Russian word for ‘openness’, referring, from 1985 to 1991 in the USSR, to increased freedom of expression and organization in political and public life. General Secretary GORBACHEV initially reduced censorship of the theatre, films and the press, allowed publication of previously banned books, generally encouraged discussion, freed certain political prisoners, allowed greater freedom of movement and more openness to Western culture. This was both a reaction against the political organizations of STALINISM and an effort to open up debate about policies, such as those contained in PERESTROIKA, which some sections of the Soviet leadership saw as necessary to lift the USSR out of economic stagnation. By 1991 when the USSR ceased to exist, Soviet people interpreted it in far wider ways than the leadership had originally envisaged. Even the role of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union was being criticized, and several republics were seeking forms of independence from Moscow. See also PERESTROIKA.

glasnost

History the policy of public frankness and accountability developed in the former Soviet Union under the leadership of Mikhail Gorbachov
References in periodicals archive ?
Glasnost Festival returns for its fourth year in 2015, and the organisers are expecting it to be the biggest and best yet.
I stood at the source of Glasnost and freedom of press, religion, political pluralism in the Soviet Union, and my position remains the same.
News & World Report is named for Artyom Borovik, who was one of the earliest and boldest practitioners of glasnost in Mikhail Gorbachev's Soviet Union in the 1980s.
Every "engagement" -- detente, glasnost, perestroika -- ended with the Communist regimes gobbling up more Free World real estate, and the spawning of more Soviet subcontractor regimes that Moscow could have do its dirty work, while denying any knowledge or complicity.
Dedicating a considerable space to Soviet popular print culture before the reading boom, the author underscores the gains of glasnost and the role of the intelligentsia in bringing about the "perestroika of reading" (p.
Russian academic Alexander Yakovlev, the brain behind glasnost and perestroika (restructuring) in the last years of the dissolved Soviet Union, will arrive in Taipei on Saturday for a weeklong visit, the Taiwan Foreign Ministry said Friday.
But if the success of Philadelphia led to The Birdcage and both in turn helped bring about the new gay glasnost in Hollywood, Brooks still believes there are limits on the studios' open minds--and open checkbooks.
Their stories naturally reflect the vagaries of memory, the official de-stalinization and revival of religion acceptable in the glasnost years, and possibly the self-selection of interviewees.
10) In the late 1980s, the wave of glasnost hit the city of Aden forcing the Yemen Socialist Party (YSP) of South Yemen to begin instituting democratic reforms, such as a multi-party system, and liberalizing the economy.
As President Reagan described our attitude toward disarmament to Mikhail Gorbachev at the height of glasnost, "trust but verify.