glass laser

glass laser

[¦glas ′lā·zər]
(optics)
A solid laser in which glass serves as the host for laser ions of such materials as erbium, holmium, neodymium, and ytterbium. Also known as amorphous laser.
References in periodicals archive ?
Curtiss-Wright's laser peening technology is based on a Neodymium glass laser technology, which was originally developed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory.
The NIF team has successfully tested the prototype frame assembly unit (FAU) bus, the enclosure that will house the glass laser amplifiers.
The only blot on the horizon appeared to be the "Christmas tree"-style sculpture, whose glass laser cone rarely seems to be working.
An operator of Livermore's neodymium-doped glass laser hears a popping sound as it strips paint from a surface and pulverizes it.
Other low-cost systems use disposable, water-cooled, glass laser tubes.
The team will design and provide a frequency tripled glass laser based on proven technologies, comprising state-of-the-art beam-smoothing techniques created at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics.
Curtiss-Wright's laser peening technology is based on a Neodymium glass laser technology, which was originally developed by Curtiss-Wright in conjunction with the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory.
2], Nd:YAG, and Nd: glass laser and laser systems for industrial application.
This includes 3072 Nd-doped phosphate glass laser slabs, 960 fused silica aspheric lenses, 960 fused silica windows, 1600 multi-layer dielectric mirrors and polarizers, 192 diffraction gratings, 192 phase plates and 576 potassium dihydrogen phosphate (KDP) plus deuterated KDP crystal plates.
developed high-power laser design and simulation codes in support of laser driven fusion, developed non-linear optical simulation codes used in the design of second harmonic generation crystals for use on very high powered glass laser systems; he was a research associate at the University of Michigan Institute of Science and Technology, Radar and Optics laboratory, built and tested lasers for use in optical data processing, and helped construct optical systems which produced the very first wide-angle, deep field-of-view holograms.
The ceramic design gives superior benefits compared to all metal or glass lasers.