Saltwort

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Related to glasswort: Sea purslane

Saltwort

 

the name of several weeds that are found in the forest steppe, semidesert, and desert. Usually they are stiff, thorny plants having the life form of tumbleweeds. The name “saltwort” is most often applied to the annual plant Salsola iberica, which is better known as Russian thistle (S. ruthenica, S. pestifer) and which is readily eaten by cattle.

References in periodicals archive ?
Dicaffeoylquinic acid derivatives and flavonoid glucosides from glasswort (Salicornia Herbacea L.
Glasswort stems had no epiphytic hydroid and only hydrocauli fragments were present on the macrophyte.
10%), Beaded Glasswort, Creeping Brookweed, Water-buttons and young Rounded Noon-flower.
Piping Plovers (Charadrius melodus), Snowy Plovers (Charadrius alexandrinus) and other small Charadrius plovers were uncommon, occurring mainly on high mudflats and algal flats before these were covered with glasswort (Salicornia bigelovii).
As far up as Cap aux Oyes, sixty or seventy miles below Quebec, Kalm found a great part of the plants near the shore to be marine, as glasswort (Salicornia), seaside pease (Pisum maritimum), sea-milkwort (Glaux), beach-grass (Psamma arenarium), seaside plantain (Plantago maritima), the sea-rocket (Bunias cakile), etc.
The lowest and most frequently inundated zones are dominated by Beaded Glasswort Sarcocornia quinqueflora.
Samphire has emerald-green knobbly stems, sometimes known as sea fennel, poor man's asparagus or glasswort from when it was used in the glassmaking industry.
The young stalks of a plant that grows on rocks at the ocean's edge, also known as samphire or glasswort.
Sometimes referred to as sea asparagus, but more accurately called glasswort, samphire is found on coastlines and is mainly harvested, in the UK, from the mud flats of East Anglia from June to September.
The flora consists of only a few species, mainly chenopods, such as saltwort (Salsola), seablite and purslane (Suaeda, Halimione), and glasswort (Salicornia [=Arthrocnemum]).
High-marsh soils commonly become hypersaline, in which case saltwort, Batis maritima, saltgrass, Distichlis spicata, and glasswort, Salicornia virginica, are present in the understory or as monospecific stands.