glial cell

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glial cell

[′glē·əl ‚sel]
(neuroscience)
References in periodicals archive ?
Glial cells are critical components of the nervous system, acting to guide their growth and connectivity with other neurons.
He will be remembered as a brilliant scientist who transformed our understanding of glial cells and as a tireless advocate who promoted equity and diversity at every turn," Marc Tessier-Lavigne, PhD, president of Stanford University said in the(http://med.
The data, along with other published preclinical data from animal models of CNS disease and injury, show that delivering healthy glial cells into the brain and spinal cord can alter the course of incurable CNS conditions.
Neoplastic lesions include glial tumours as the most common type.
9) Retinal glial cells can produce several neurotrophic factors, such as brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF), and nerve growth factor (NGF) that have neuroprotective effects under pathological conditions.
The most common type of glial cell in the eye of mammals is the Muller glial (MG) cell.
Named for glue, glial cells were considered the scaffolding, the housekeepers, the maintenance crew, the infrastructure.
These consisted of mostly concentric structures similar to those of glial processes and lamellae around axons (Hartline and Kong, 2009), with some multilayer membranes that diminished without going all the way around the cell body.
Demonstrating glial activation in chronic pain suggests that these cells may be a therapeutic target, and the consistency with which we found glial activation in chronic pain patients suggests that our results may be an important step towards developing biomarkers for pain conditions.
Glial cells, sometimes called neuroglia or simply glia, are non-neuronal cells that maintain homeostasis, form myelin, and provide support and protection for neurons in the brain and peripheral nervous system.
However, how glial cells interact with neurons in modulating manganese-induced toxicity in non-tumor neural cell lines has not been elucidated.
To test the theory, Horvath and his team selectively knocked out leptin receptors in the adult non-neuronal glial cells of mice.