glide slope


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glide slope

[′glīd ‚slōp]
(aerospace engineering)
(navigation)
An inclined electromagnetic surface which is generated by instrument-landing approach facilities and which includes a glide path supplying guidance in the vertical plane. Also known as glide plane.
References in periodicals archive ?
Instrument landing system, approach lighting system, glide slope indicator, high intensity airport beacon, high intensity runway edge lights, high intensity threshold and end lights, runway end identifier lights, wind cone (preferably lighted), lighted signing, lighted distance remaining signing, and taxiway edge lights.
PAPI managed to get us on a good glide slope for an uneventful landing.
Trying to fly the proper glide slope as indicated by the LSO or the mirror was often a serious and sometimes deadly task.
Taken in the aggregate, a harmonization of requirements and production rates will lead to a gradual downsizing of the base, preferably on a glide slope lasting several years.
Approaching the "in-close" position during the mishap pass, the pilot overcorrected a slightly above glide slope position with a significant power reduction while simultaneously making a large lineup and nose-down correction.
Capt Powers recognized the decrease in aircraft performance caused by the high density altitude and elected to delay gear extension until glide slope intercept.
Another cockpit gauge shows pilots if they are above or below the glide slope as they descend to the runway.
The project will re-align the western portion of the taxiway and includes construction of a concrete taxiway, asphalt shoulder pavement, service road relocation, airfield lighting and signage systems, storm drain system, sanitary sewer relocation, other miscellaneous underground utilities, and the relocation and upgrade of the Runway 8L glide slope facility.
Limited Tenders are invited for Rfp For Supply Of Circuit Diagram Of Glide Slope Pcb For Ils Each-01
Descent on the glide slope was described by the copilot as being made in "heavy turbulence.
The steep approach procedure was developed especially for operating at LCY because its instrument landing requires a glide slope of 5.
The U-2 produces so much lift even at idle power, that to land safely without flaps and speedbrakes, the approach must be flown on a 1 1/4 degree glide slope, approximately 2 knots above the onset of stall buffet.