glioma

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Related to gliomas: meningiomas

glioma

[glī′ō·mə]
(medicine)
A malignant tumor derived from the supporting tissue of the central nervous system.
References in periodicals archive ?
Nanoparticles of 1-100 nm in diameter [5] can be tailored and utilized as contrast agents for gliomas.
7 In one study,8 gross total resection was achieved in 86% of the patients with supratentorial gliomas and improvement or stability was seen in 97% of these patients, while the rate of neurological morbidity was 40% with partial resection.
Knowledge of the purpose of these driver genes and the status of these cancer subtypes could further assist in the search for treatments or prognostic information on both glioma and other cancer types.
Infiltrating gliomas, when discussed from a histologic and historical frame of reference, consist of 2 broad classes of tumors, originally designated based on their morphologic characteristics alone that recall 2 nonneoplastic glial cell types: oligodendrogliomas and infiltrating astrocytomas.
Glioma is one of the most-common types of cancerous tumors originating in the brain.
High-grade gliomas cause more deaths than any other form of brain cancer, partly due to the extreme difficulty surgeons have in removing all of the tumor cells.
The team also found that a number of the 277 cytokines they looked at played a key role in glioma development, but this needs to confirmed with future research.
The Olig2 transcription factor is highly expressed in all diffuse gliomas and is found in virtually all GBM cells that are positive for the tumorigenic CD133 cancer stem cell marker.
Conclusion: Concious level, Kernofsky performance score, control of seizures and headache are important parameters for surgical outcome in patients with low grade gliomas and improved in significant number of our patients.
Cells within the malignant brain tumour, glioma, rely on fats to fuel growth.
Among women, the magnitude of risk was 23% higher for glioma, and 16% higher for meningioma--a type of mostly non-cancerous brain tumor arising in the layers of tissue (meninges) that surround and protect the brain and spinal cord--than it was for women who didn't go on to higher education.