globalization

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globalization

Operating around the world. Although many large companies have globalized for decades, the Web, more than any other phenomenon, has enabled the smallest company to have a global presence. See localization.

globalization

A mulifaceted process in which the world is becoming more and more interconnected and communication is becoming instanteneous. Aspects of this process include:
  1. the transformation of the spatial arrangement and organization of social relations involving ‘action at a distance’, a stretching of social relations and transactions (and power), including instantaneous communications across time-space;
  2. the increasing extensity, intensity, velocity and impact of global social relations and transactions (see Held et al. 1999);
  3. the creation of new networks and nodes – the ‘network society’ (CASTELLS) – associated with the new levels of dependence on knowledge/ information and ‘expert systems – the ‘information’ or ‘knowledge society’ – as well as the new risks associated with this – RISK SOCIETY;
  4. a dialect between the global and the local in which (consistent with a dialect of power and the duality of structure) the outcome is not a simple triumph of the centre over the periphery, mere Americanization’, or suchlike (see also MCDONALDIZATION).

As Held et al. (1999) suggest, a ‘vibrant’ ongoing debate exists on the characterization of globalization between three groups of theorists:

  1. ‘hyperglobalizers’ (e.g. Ohmae 1990; 1995) for whom global marketization is the main driver;
  2. 'S ceptics’ (notably Hirst and Thompson 1996a and b), who play down the level and distinctiveness of the change;
  3. ‘transformationalists’, including GIDDENS, for whom globalization is a distinctive new phase such that societies and states across the globe are experiencing profound social as well as economic changes – a ‘massive shake-out’ of social relations, economies, governance and politics – as they seek to adapt to an increasingly interconnected but also unpredictable and uncertain world.
References in periodicals archive ?
One of the more appealing qualities of Grounded Globalism is the vast number of "forces" examined in the text.
Globalism, a current national strategy in industrialized nations, was born out of economical globalism and the sharing of the information in information technology and has a nature of destroying time honored traditions.
Though globalism seeks to bring the world together into one global village and celebrate the differences of all, in fact neither union nor difference has been achieved.
While the contradictions of such musical fusion projects, in their attempts to be specific while simultaneously universal, appear under the banner of globalism, Cooley gives us more examples of how this music simply perpetuates more placeless and contradictory music.
Neill convincingly suggests that the improbable and marvellous characteristics of Gulliver's fictional voyages embody Swift's own scepticism concerning mercantilist globalism and economic nationalism.
to the discussion of globalization, globalism and global governance mapped out in the introduction.
22) Yet it may also relate to the effect of the long economic boom just now ending in which commercial connections in the form of technology and globalism made the independent individual and his/her response appear an even greater cipher than before.
Amid the Iraq war, the world faces the risk of a retreat of economic globalism, something that cannot be allowed to affect the markets.
As Norman Solomon points out in his "Media Beat" column on page thirty-five, this isn't the version of globalism George W.
At most, under Clinton and Bush before him, the United States acted like the benign but barely attentive custodian of globalism.
That they should mark it simply at the level of disaster--that their bond with us should be not world trade or political alliance but that more basic form of globalism, the knowledge of disaster--was something more like a grace.
Bilderberg is basically one of those big-think organizations wherein an elite (some of them Jews, many not) gather to bloviate about globalism, the economy, and politics; it bears more resemblance to Davos than ZOG.