glove


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glove,

hand covering with a separate sheath for each finger. The earliest gloves, relics of the cave dwellers, closely resembled bags. Reaching to the elbow, they were most probably worn solely for protection and warmth. Although there is some indication of the use of separate fingers in an Egyptian relic, most early gloves were much like mittens, usually of skin with the fur inside. The glove as we know it today dates from the 11th cent. In England after the Norman conquest, gloves, richly jeweled and ornamented, were worn as a badge of distinction by royalty and by church dignitaries. The glove became meaningful as a token; it became custom to fling a gauntlet, the symbol of honor, at the feet of an adversary, thereby challenging his integrity and inviting satisfaction by duel. In the 12th cent. gloves became a definite part of fashionable dress, and ladies began to wear them; the sport of falconry also increased their use. In the 13th cent. the metal gauntlet appeared as a part of armor. Gloves became accessible to the common people, and their popularity grew. Scented gloves, an innovation that was to last until the 18th cent., came into vogue. The 16th and 17th cent. saw extravagantly ornamented gloves; they were of leather, linen, silk, or lace and were jeweled, embroidered, or fringed. After the 17th cent. the emphasis was on proper fit, and gloves were less ornamental. The first known glove maker was in Perth, Scotland, after 1165; a guild of glove makers was incorporated in France in 1190, and one in London c.1600. In the United States, glove making began in 1760 when a settlement of Scottish glovers was established at Gloversville, N.Y.; New York state has since been the center of the glove industry in the United States. Modern gloves are made of fabric, plain or knitted; of leather from almost every variety of animal hide; and of rubber and plastic used in surgical, laboratory, and household work.

Bibliography

See C. C. Collins, Love of a Glove (1945).

glove

glove
i. The fixed leading portion of a wing root of a variable swept wing. If there is a provision for carrying external stores at this location, it is known as a glove station.
ii. A covering for the hand made of leather or fire-resistant material.

glove

Sport any of various large protective hand covers worn in sports, such as a boxing glove
References in classic literature ?
Each put on one nice light glove, and carried one soiled one, and all pronounced the effect "quite easy and fine".
Her stockings and boots and well fitting gloves had worked marvels in her bearing--had given her a feeling of assurance, a sense of belonging to the well-dressed multitude.
And, since Satan saw fit to steal it, your reverence must needs handle him without gloves henceforward," remarked the old sexton, grimly smiling.
The cut of her dress from the waist upward, both before and behind, made her figure very like a boy's kite; and I might have pronounced her gown a little too decidedly orange, and her gloves a little too intensely green.
This defiance hath already been sent to thee by thy sewer; thou underliest it, and art bound to answer me There lies my glove.
Henry II wore jewelled gloves reaching to the elbow, and had a hawk-glove sewn with twelve rubies and fifty-two great orients.
Isidore, who had taken his lady's hand and was covering it with kisses through the little round place in the glove-- like this, gentlemen"--rapturously kissing the bit of palm left bare in the middle of her thread gloves.
Every now and then my glove purchase in Gibraltar last night intrudes itself upon me.
A strange lady, the one who had been talking to the priests, rose and offered him her seat; an aide-de-camp picked up and returned a glove Pierre had dropped; the doctors became respectfully silent as he passed by, and moved to make way for him.
Sinclair, or as he preferred to be called, Professor Sinclair, waved a white kid glove in the direction of the dancing hall.
Then, as soon as he recovered his breath a little, he shook the snow out of his boots and out of his left-hand glove (the right-hand glove was hopelessly lost and by this time probably lying somewhere under a dozen inches of snow); then as was his custom when going out of his shop to buy grain from the peasants, he pulled his girdle low down and tightened it and prepared for action.
Bartley took her wrist and began to button the long gray suede glove.

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