glowing combustion

glowing combustion

[¦glō·iŋ kəm′bəs·chən]
(chemical engineering)
A reaction between oxygen or an oxidizer and the surface of a solid fuel so that there is emission of heat and light without a flame. Also known as surface burning.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Lignin, which contributes mainly to the char and supports most of the glowing combustion, starts decomposing at about 220 [degrees]C.
Specimens do not burn up to the holding clamp, drip and ignite the cotton, or have glowing combustion persisting for 30 seconds after the second removal of the test flame.