gnat-catcher

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gnat-catcher

or

gnatwren:

see kingletkinglet,
common name for members of a subfamily of five species of Old and New World warblers, similar to the thrushes and the Old World flycatchers. Kinglets are small birds (4 in./10 cm) with soft, fluffy, olive or grayish green plumage and bright crown patches.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Critical habitat had not been assigned for all 32 threatened and endangered species, whereas a large designation for the California gnatcatcher has dominated the land use rules.
Because of the social/political influences brought about by the existence of the wetlands area and the gnatcatcher nest, I interviewed representatives from the two most powerful environmental groups in the area.
Elevational distribution of California Gnatcatchers on the United States.
The East El Capitan donation preserves an unspoiled mountain view and an ideal habitat where threatened California coastal gnatcatchers may find a new home to spread their wings.
For instance, in a study of the threatened California gnatcatcher (Polioptila c.
Much of the protection endangered species have under ESA comes as a result of such citizen lawsuits under the critical habitat provisions of ESA, especially since a 1997 decision by the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals in a case involving the California gnatcatcher, where the court ruled that Interior's practice of letting designations slide was unlawful.
Coastal sage scrub vegetation serves as breeding habitat for a threatened bird, the coastal California gnatcatcher (Polioptila californica californica).
California Gnatcatcher Under the Endangered Species Act, 60 Fed.
The only endangered species that Edelman expects to be affected by the fires is the California gnatcatcher, a bird that has caused developers in San Diego fits because its sensitive habitats cannot be disturbed.
Phylogeography of the California Gnatcatcher (Polioptila californica) using multilocus DNA sequences and ecological niche modeling: implications for conservation.
The blue-gray gnatcatcher is common in eastern Nebraska (Zimmer, 1917) but is a rare transient in spring in western Nebraska (Brown and Brown, 2001).