Golden Plover

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Golden Plover

 

(Pluvialis apricaria), a bird of the suborder Limicolae of the order Charadriiformes. Body length, 25–30 cm; weight, approximately 200 g. The back is black with yellow speckles, and the underside of the body is white with a longitudinal black band. The golden plover is found in Iceland and northern Europe and Western and Central Siberia. In winter it migrates primarily to Great Britain and the western Mediterranean region. It inhabits mossy bogs, tundra, and forest tundra. It builds its nest on the ground; the clutch contains four eggs. The golden plover eats small invertebrates, seeds, and berries. It is hunted for sport.

References in periodicals archive ?
Previous research has shown how changes in the timing of the golden plover breeding season as a result of increasing spring temperatures might affect their ability to match the spring emergence of their cranefly (daddy long legs) prey.
Golden Plovers are a beautiful spangled golden colour, with a mottled yellowy-brown breast.
The moors support a number of threatened species, including short-eared owls, golden plovers, snipe and lapwings.
Furthermore, red kites, buzzards (both with many foraging flights), kestrels, yellowhammers, golden plovers and snipe are also regularly found there - for example with snipe throughout the winter: "up to five individuals flushed from the site whilst walking through boggy ground".
The study warns that if climate change predictions prove accurate, golden plovers will be nesting three weeks earlier by 2100.
Signs of migration include golden plovers on the Great Orme and the departure of the goldeneyes from RSPB Conwy; surely the first wheatear of spring is only days away?
This year, we are focusing on upland habitats and have even brought some heather moorland to demonstrate ideal habitats for birds such as black grouse, curlews and golden plovers.
Birdlife on the moors includes such rare species as golden plovers, dunlins, twites, ring ouzels, red grouse and curlews.
But most won't know where it begins in a wild upland landscape with curlews and golden plovers," said project officer Phil Gray.
Tunnicliffe's book Shorelands Summer Diary included 16 paintings of golden plovers, whimbrel, shoveler ducks, shag, black-tailed godwits, red-necked phalarope and peregrine falcons.
In the late 1970s, the Welsh population of golden plovers was 250-300 pairs.
Lapwings fared best where moors are managed for grouse shooting, but golden plovers suffered their steepest declines on these moors.