Goldeneye

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Goldeneye

 

(Bucephala clangula), a bird of the subfamily Nyrocinae. Measuring up to 50 cm in length, it weighs 600–1.100 gm. The plumage in both males and females is dark gray; in the spring, the male’s plumage becomes black and white, with white spots at the base of the bill. The goldeneye is distributed in Europe. Asia, and North America. In the USSR it is found in the forest and part of the forested steppezones. The bird swims and dives well. It lives on open lakes and fast-flowing rivers and feeds on small fish, water invertebrates, and the seeds of aquatic plants. The goldeneye arrives in the spring with the appearance of the first wormwoods. Nesting in hollows, frequently high above the ground, it lays 8–12 eggs. It is easily acclimatized to simulated tree hollows, where its eggs can easily be gathered. It migrates in the winter. In the USSR the goldeneye winters in the southern seas and lakes; however, in bodies of water that do not freeze, it may winter in the north or even high in the mountains. It is of commercial value. A related form, the Icelandic goldeneye (B. islandica), dwells in Iceland, Greenland, and North America.

A. I. IVANOV

References in periodicals archive ?
Before long, we heard their tell-tale whistle, and an instant later a squadron of goldeneyes rocketed over the decoys.
It's as wild a sound as I know, the flute-like whistle of a goldeneye flight, a sound straight from the northern boreal vastness where they live.
Bill and I are squatting on our heels in 18 inches of frigid river water on the lee side of a cottonwood deadfall, watching as one goldeneye and then another rocket by in front of us, all just barely out of range.
Nova Scotians still hunt them from sink boxes, and on both sides of the border they're hunted with actual goldeneye decoys and apparently even with sculling rigs, seriously cool paraphernalia.
It turned out his bird--at 20 years, 5 months--was the oldest banded common goldeneye drake on record.
Even with many hours spent trying to catch some shuteye in various airport lobbies, I wouldn't trade the entire experience of hunting blue ducks and Barrow's goldeneyes for anything.
Tim Bouchard of Alaska Wildfowl Adventures offers hunts for harlequin ducks and Barrow's goldeneyes in Valdez, Alaska, from Nov.
As we pulled up to our hunting spot for the day, Bouchard made fast work of putting out two strings of goldeneye decoys and five harlequin decoys just off to the side.
I was quickly proved wrong when I shot my first goldeneye at closer than 10 yards, decoying straight into my face.