Goldeneye

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Goldeneye

 

(Bucephala clangula), a bird of the subfamily Nyrocinae. Measuring up to 50 cm in length, it weighs 600–1.100 gm. The plumage in both males and females is dark gray; in the spring, the male’s plumage becomes black and white, with white spots at the base of the bill. The goldeneye is distributed in Europe. Asia, and North America. In the USSR it is found in the forest and part of the forested steppezones. The bird swims and dives well. It lives on open lakes and fast-flowing rivers and feeds on small fish, water invertebrates, and the seeds of aquatic plants. The goldeneye arrives in the spring with the appearance of the first wormwoods. Nesting in hollows, frequently high above the ground, it lays 8–12 eggs. It is easily acclimatized to simulated tree hollows, where its eggs can easily be gathered. It migrates in the winter. In the USSR the goldeneye winters in the southern seas and lakes; however, in bodies of water that do not freeze, it may winter in the north or even high in the mountains. It is of commercial value. A related form, the Icelandic goldeneye (B. islandica), dwells in Iceland, Greenland, and North America.

A. I. IVANOV

References in periodicals archive ?
Separation of Barrow's and Common goldeneyes in all plumages.
Goldeneyes were identified by two observers, a navigator in front of the helicopter and a compiler at the rear of the cabin on the same side as the navigator.
Goldeneyes rely on aquatic invertebrates for food (Bendell and McNicol 1995, Eadie et al.
Density-dependence, frequency-dependence, and alternative nesting behaviours in goldeneyes.
Goldeneyes were the main users of nest boxes in the study area, confirming their usefulness as a potential management tool in the boreal forest of the Laurentian Highlands.
Comparative reproductive biology of female Buffleheads (Bucephala albeola) and Barrow's Goldeneye (Bucephala islandica) in central British Columbia.
Role of food in territoriality and egg production of Buffleheads (Bucephala albeola) and Barrow's Goldeneye (Bucephala islandica).
Unlike the East Coast and lake states, where goldeneyes and most other divers are hunted over large bodies of water like the Atlantic Ocean and Lake Superior, western whistlers (usually common goldeneyes rather than the more rare Barrow's) are almost always hunted on rivers, because by the time they migrate south in enough numbers to make a hunt interesting, everything else has already frozen.
Before long, we heard their tell-tale whistle, and an instant later a squadron of goldeneyes rocketed over the decoys.
01), and was lower for goldeneyes than for mergansers ([[chi square].
Goldeneyes and mergansers had similar hatching success (90 vs.
It turned out his bird--at 20 years, 5 months--was the oldest banded common goldeneye drake on record.