goldfinch

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goldfinch:

see finchfinch,
common name for members of the Fringillidae, the largest family of birds (including over half the known species), found in most parts of the world except Australia.
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Goldfinch

 

(Carduelis carduelis), a bird of the family Fringillidae of the order Passeriformes. The body length is 12 cm. The wings are black with a yellow stripe, and the crown is black or gray. There is a red ring around the beak. The goldfinch occurs in Europe, Western Asia, and Northwest Africa. In the USSR it is found from the western border east to the Enisei River. The goldfinch settles in deciduous groves, felled areas, and gardens. It nests in shrubs or trees. A clutch contains four to six eggs, which are incubated for 12 or 13 days by the female. The bird feeds on seeds of broad bean sorrel, burdock, thistle, and other weeds. The nestlings are fed insects. Goldfinches are frequently kept as pets.

goldfinch

1. a common European finch, Carduelis carduelis, the adult of which has a red-and-white face and yellow-and-black wings
2. any of several North American finches of the genus Spinus, esp the yellow-and-black species S. tristis
References in periodicals archive ?
Bluebird pairs were significantly more aggressive towards models of wrens (a nest-competitor) than goldfinches (a noncompetitor).
Over the same time, numbers of goldfinches seen in gardens during the Big Garden Birdwatch have steadily creased.
Inside, they discovered three wild goldfinches imprisoned in cages.
The study found goldfinches were now seen in 61 per cent of gardens - up from just one per cent in the 1970s.
Siskins, bramblings, redpolls and goldfinches were all more common in the region's gardens.
A FLOCK of goldfinches has been spotted in the heart of bustling Birmingham city centre.
A BIRD fancier who illegally trapped and caged 20 wild goldfinches was fined pounds 1,000 and ordered to carry out 120 hours of community service, the RSPCA said yesterday.
FAMILIES of multicoloured goldfinches are roaming the countryside in search of their favourite seeds.
A pair of acrobatic American goldfinches alight on a cylindrical hanging bird feeder, hungrily searching for thistle seeds.
Ed and Jane Stauss said the birds they saw Friday and Saturday in their yard included scrub jays, house sparrows, house finches, Anna's hummingbirds, mourning doves, lesser goldfinches, California towhees and dark-eyed juncos.
Other birds stolen included: a Siberian pied brown finch with a white beak and white spots; a red and white pied cock, a brown bullfinch hen, a goldfinch mule with a bright orange face, several bullfinch cocks, a native brown and black bullfinch, three brown Siberian bull-finches, four red split cock Siberian bullfinches, three goldfinches and a green canary.