Goliards

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Goliards

wandering scholar-poets of satirical Latin verse celebrating sensual pleasure. [Medieval Hist.: NCE, 1105]
See: Revelry

Goliards

scholar-poets interested mainly in earthly delights. [Medieval Hist.: Bishop, 292–293]

Goliards

wandering scholar-poets of 12th-century Europe. [Medieval Hist.: NCE, 1105]
References in periodicals archive ?
Mottram describes the London Cape Goliard edition of The Last Words of Dutch Schultz as a cinematic text beginning with "four full-page images of a man shot in a street, the original movie shot sequence reduced to a minimum graphic immediacy of violence.
In 1227 the Council of Trier forbade priests to permit goliards to take part in chanting the service.
The international background of goliardic songs and paraliturgical compositions also warns us of the futility of trying to pronounce Latin according to habits of a particular time and place, be it Fleury, Dublin, or Trier; or the Beauvais in the mid-twelfth century: the Latin of the goliards knew no national boundaries and Ralph, an Englishman, was a pupil of Abelard, Breton born of Poitevin stock.
He has been actively involved in writing and poetry workshops for twenty years, and his writing has appeared in North American Review, Arizona Quarterly, the Ambrosian, North American Mentor and Mentor Anthologies, Trace, The Goliards, Fine Arts Discovery, WeightWatchers magazine, Journal of the Upper Mississippi, and Mississippi Valley Writing, among others.
Hunting and military signals, fanfares at tournaments and feasts were certainly part of court life, where people could also listen to the music of the itinerant musicians known as joculatores, histriones, spielmans, jongleurs, goliards and so on.
Villon jette son froc aux orties, perd ses droits universitaires et devient, comme les Goliards de jadis, un mercier ambulant, un organisateur de spectacles de la rue et, en fin de compte, un Coquillard.
Furthermore, any analysis of the roundel's seventeen decimas and final quatrain rapidly reveals that there is not a single reference to any identifiable aspect of India and that the composition abounds in topoi of the most general and banal kind with which social types had been lampooned and lambasted from at least the time of the Goliards onwards.
Far from being an aberration, the goliards were the driving force of Latin rhythmic poetry, sacred and profane.
The Goliards, as the authors were called, often referred to a mythical Golias as their leader and patron, ironically dignifying him with the titles of " Bishop " ( episcopus ) and " Archpoet " ( archipoeta ).
Such associations extend the Arlecchino's links backward to medieval extempore players and goliards in Italy and France, while they illuminate commedia's continuing development during the mid sixteenth century in carnival, rustic farces, and dialect theater with lured types.
Significantly, there is no mention of the goliards either in this article or in the index to the book.
In the Sorbonne the students held debates in Latin; there were even goliards.