go

(redirected from gone)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Financial, Acronyms, Idioms, Wikipedia.

go

or

i-go,

a board game popular in Japan that probably originated in China or India as long ago as the third millennium B.C. The board is marked by a grid of 19 horizontal and 19 vertical lines to form 361 intersections. Of the 361 pieces, 181 are black stones and 180 are white. The player with the black stones begins by placing a stone on any intersection. The players alternate turns. The object for each player is to control the most territory on the board while capturing as many of the opposing player's stones as possible. Stones are captured and removed from the board when they are completely encircled and are deprived of any access, either directly or through a chain of like stones, to a free space. A game is over when all the empty spaces on the board either are controlled by one or the other player or cannot be controlled by either player. The winner is the player who controls the most open spaces after the stones captured by the opposing player have been substracted. The complexity of go has made it, like chess, a subject for artificial intelligenceartificial intelligence
(AI), the use of computers to model the behavioral aspects of human reasoning and learning. Research in AI is concentrated in some half-dozen areas.
..... Click the link for more information.
 research, but it was regarded as a more difficult challenge than chess. In 2016–17, however, versions of Google's DeepMind AlphaGo defeated top go players.

Bibliography

See E. Lasker, Go and Go-Moku (rev. ed. 1960).

go

, I-go
a game for two players in which stones are placed on a board marked with a grid, the object being to capture territory on the board

Go

(games, application)
A thinking game with an oriental origin estimated to be around 4000 years old. Nowadays, the game is played by millions of people in (most notably) China, Japan, Korea and Taiwan. In the Western world the game is practised by a yearly increasing number of players. On the Internet Go players meet, play and talk 24 hours/day on the Internet Go Server (IGS).

http://cwi.nl/~jansteen/go/go.html.

Usenet newsgroup: news:rec.games.go.

go

(1) The title of an on-screen button that is clicked in order to start some action such as a search.

(2) A command used on a BBS or online service to switch the user to a particular forum or section. For example, typing go macintosh would switch you to a section specializing in Macintosh computers. Like any command language, you have to know what words to enter.
References in classic literature ?
At Oakbourne, the ostler at the Royal Oak remembered such a young woman as Adam described getting out of the Treddleston coach more than a fortnight ago--wasn't likely to forget such a pretty lass as that in a hurry--was sure she had not gone on by the Buxton coach that went through Snowfield, but had lost sight of her while he went away with the horses and had never set eyes on her again.
It seems strange that Adam, in the incessant occupation of his mind about Hetty, should never have alighted on the probability that she had gone to Windsor, ignorant that Arthur was no longer there.
With this last determination on his mind, of going straight to Arthur, the thought that he had spent two days in inquiries which had proved to be almost useless, was torturing to Adam; and yet, since he would not tell the Poysers his conviction as to where Hetty was gone, or his intention to follow her thither, he must be able to say to them that he had traced her as far as possible.
Dinah's been gone to Leeds ever since last Friday was a fortnight, the very day Hetty set out.
I can't tell thee where I'm going, and thee must say to her I'm gone on business as nobody is to know anything about.
Poyser, after pursuing his walk for a little while, went on, "I'll be bound she's gone after trying to get a lady's maid's place, for she'd got that in her head half a year ago, and wanted me to gi' my consent.
He had no warrant for the certainty that she was gone to Arthur.
She's been gone to Leeds this fortnight, and I couldn't learn from th' old woman any direction where she is at Leeds, else I should ha' brought it you.
It was not a rumbling time of the year, and the gentlemen being most of them gone out of town, Tunbridge, and Epsom, and such places were full of people.
So I left her, took the fellow up to my chamber, gave him the trunk, or portmanteau, for it was like a trunk, and wrapped it about with an old apron, and he went directly to his boat with it, and I after him, nobody asking us the least question about it; as for the drunken Dutch footman he was still asleep, and his master with other foreign gentlemen at supper, and very merry below, so I went clean off with it to Ipswich; and going in the night, the people of the house knew nothing but that I was gone to London by the Harwich wherry, as I had told my landlady.
This I did because I knew the Dutch gentlemen and their servants would be upon the road that day, either in the stagecoaches or riding post, and I did not know but the drunken fellow, or somebody else that might have seen me at Harwich, might see me again, and so I thought that in one day's stop they would be all gone by.
The young ladies had been all married or gone to London; the old gentleman and the old lady that had been my early benefactress all dead; and which troubled me most, the young gentleman my first lover, and afterwards my brother-in-law, was dead; but two sons, men grown, were left of him, but they too were transplanted to London.