Gossip

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Related to gossiper: rumormonger

Gossip

See also Slander.
Gourmandism (See EPICUREANISM, GLUTTONY.)
Graciousness (See COURTESY, HOSPITALITY.)
assembly of women
symbolizes gossip in dream context. [Dream Lore: Jobes, 143]
Blondie and Tootsie
two characters continually gossiping from morning to night. [Comics: “Blondie” in Horn, 118]
Duchess of Berwick
rumor-jabbering woman upsets Lady Windermere. [Br. Lit.: Lady Windermere’s Fan, Magill I, 488–490]
Norris, Mrs.
Fanny’s aunt, the universal type of busybody. [Br. Lit.: Mansfield Park, Magill I, 562–564]
Peyton Place
New Hampshire town where everyone knows everyone else’s business. [Am. Lit.: Peyton Place, Payton, 523]
Sneerwell, Lady
leader of a group that creates and spreads malicious gossip. [Br. Drama: Sheridan The School for Scandal]
References in periodicals archive ?
Confidently talk to everyone including the gossiper, telling them that you know someone is spreading rumours and that these are untrue.
Indeed in the most dramatic case examined, which involves sorcery accusations leveled at a man with a prestigious job overseas, a public attempt at denying the gossip and confronting the gossipers, ends in further social sanctions for the accused, which are justified by the fact that he angrily denied the initial accusations of his misdeeds.
According to Thomas, having a reputation as a gossiper can ruin the viability of an employee.
It can amplify friendship between gossiper and listener.
So what do we make of the condensed, ellipical comedy that results, in which Austen delights in making herself the carnally minded gossiper, the whiner, the depreciator, the lover of a grievance--and sometimes makes Cassandra one as well?
By beginning your exchange in a diplomatic, nonjudgmental way, the gossiper is less likely to get defensive or sabotage the conversation.
Bev scuppers Shelley's date with Charlie, but everyone's favourite gossiper, Betty, lands her in it.
Tylus examines permutations of Fama, the monstrous gossiper of Vergil's Aeneid in two Renaissance plays, Jacopo Nardi's carnival play, Due felici rivali (1513) and Guarini's Il pastorfido (1590).
No gossiper in South Pike really liked Humphrey because he prized truth over embellishment.
Everyone accepts his contention that he is no idle gossiper, instead minding his own business, talking infrequently to anyone, and keeping the surrounding woods free of strangers.
Turning around to find the ex-fiance, the malicious gossiper, or the perpetually combative coworker with hand extended can be very challenging.
Or you are a great gossiper, or somebody who is empathetic to what others are thinking and feeling, but none of that gets written.