Gossip

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Gossip

See also Slander.
Gourmandism (See EPICUREANISM, GLUTTONY.)
Graciousness (See COURTESY, HOSPITALITY.)
assembly of women
symbolizes gossip in dream context. [Dream Lore: Jobes, 143]
Blondie and Tootsie
two characters continually gossiping from morning to night. [Comics: “Blondie” in Horn, 118]
Duchess of Berwick
rumor-jabbering woman upsets Lady Windermere. [Br. Lit.: Lady Windermere’s Fan, Magill I, 488–490]
Norris, Mrs.
Fanny’s aunt, the universal type of busybody. [Br. Lit.: Mansfield Park, Magill I, 562–564]
Peyton Place
New Hampshire town where everyone knows everyone else’s business. [Am. Lit.: Peyton Place, Payton, 523]
Sneerwell, Lady
leader of a group that creates and spreads malicious gossip. [Br. Drama: Sheridan The School for Scandal]
References in classic literature ?
Take care, however, you don't betray either of us to Zoraide--to my daughter, I mean; she is so discreet and circumspect herself, she cannot understand that one should find a pleasure in gossiping a little--"
Well, all the beach is gossiping about it; and Tudor persisted in repeating the gossip to me.
Happy, well-fed children were playing games, and stout housewives sat on the front steps gossiping.
I am afraid there has been gossiping of some kind at the George.
Also, by gossiping about mutually interesting topics, such as dislike of a third person, ISs build friendships and a social network (Wert & Salovey, 2004).
Often graduates are told to network, but people end up networking by gossiping with co-workers or even higher-ups.
The study, which asked 121 of the university's undergraduates to analyse their motives for gossiping, found that although some wanted to manipulate others, entertain themselves or find out information about a mutual acquaintance, others chose to gossip to protect the group from harmful behaviour among some members.
Excessive gossiping at the workplace may not be good for you or your co- workers.
In a sense, they have been gossiping about Brett, and it is "rather a knock" for her to learn that Romeo has been ashamed of her in front of his friends (242).
Based on a close ethnographic investigation of Nukulaelae islander's discourses about and practices of gossiping, this work highlights gossip's ability to serve as a means of negotiating the ethical conflicts and ideological contradictions that present themselves as part of everyday life, suggesting that gossip, an oft maligned and ostensibly marginal practice, can serve a means for people to engage in small scale (but potentially far reaching) political acts.
A quarter of those polled said they felt guilty after gossiping about others.
So his advice on gossiping is simple: "Don't listen to gossip and don't pass on gossip.