Gossip

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Gossip

See also Slander.
Gourmandism (See EPICUREANISM, GLUTTONY.)
Graciousness (See COURTESY, HOSPITALITY.)
assembly of women
symbolizes gossip in dream context. [Dream Lore: Jobes, 143]
Blondie and Tootsie
two characters continually gossiping from morning to night. [Comics: “Blondie” in Horn, 118]
Duchess of Berwick
rumor-jabbering woman upsets Lady Windermere. [Br. Lit.: Lady Windermere’s Fan, Magill I, 488–490]
Norris, Mrs.
Fanny’s aunt, the universal type of busybody. [Br. Lit.: Mansfield Park, Magill I, 562–564]
Peyton Place
New Hampshire town where everyone knows everyone else’s business. [Am. Lit.: Peyton Place, Payton, 523]
Sneerwell, Lady
leader of a group that creates and spreads malicious gossip. [Br. Drama: Sheridan The School for Scandal]
References in classic literature ?
At two or three epochs, when the fortunes of the family were low, this representative of hereditary qualities had made his appearance, and caused the traditionary gossips of the town to whisper among themselves, "Here is the old Pyncheon come again
Why, gossips, what is it but to laugh in the faces of our godly magistrates, and make a pride out of what they, worthy gentlemen, meant for a punishment?
From his half-itinerant life, also, he was a kind of traveling gazette, carrying the whole budget of local gossip from house to house, so that his appearance was always greeted with satisfaction.
Some days later, when gossip on the subject was subsiding, a fresh scandal revived it.
And if you go and tell any of those old gossips in the ship about this thing, I'll never forgive you for it; that's all.
Here the young gossips, growing warm at the memory of the entrance of monsieur the legate, both began to talk at once.
But Astok had no such plan in mind, for such a move would have meant the spreading of the fact among the palace gossips that the Ptarthian princess was a prisoner in the east tower.
There'll be one or two quilting parties, I suppose; and all the old gossips will talk you over to your face and behind your back.
He hid it when he saw me and looked real silly; but after I had talked to him awhile I just asked him about it, and told him that the gossips said he wrote poetry in it, and if he did would he tell me, because I was dying to know.
Mrs Kenwigs, too, was quite a lady in her manners, and of a very genteel family, having an uncle who collected a water-rate; besides which distinction, the two eldest of her little girls went twice a week to a dancing school in the neighbourhood, and had flaxen hair, tied with blue ribbons, hanging in luxuriant pigtails down their backs; and wore little white trousers with frills round the ankles--for all of which reasons, and many more equally valid but too numerous to mention, Mrs Kenwigs was considered a very desirable person to know, and was the constant theme of all the gossips in the street, and even three or four doors round the corner at both ends.
Can we not do without the society of our gossips a little while under these circumstances -- have our own thoughts to cheer us?
Lawrence has been seen to go that way once or twice of an evening - and the village gossips say he goes to pay his addresses to the strange lady, and the scandal- mongers have greedily seized the rumour, to make it the basis of their own infernal structure.