gouache


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gouache

(gwäsh): see watercolor paintingwatercolor painting,
in its wider sense, refers to all pigments mixed with water rather than with oil and also to the paintings produced by this process; it includes fresco and tempera as well as aquarelle, the process now commonly meant by the generic term.
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Gouache

A method of painting using opaque pigments pulverized in water and mixed with gum.

Gouache

 

paints consisting of finely ground pigments mixed with a water-glue binder (gum arabic, wheat starch, dextrin, or a similar substance) and an admixture of white; also, a work of art painted with these colors.

Gouache is generally used for painting on paper, cardboard, plywood, canvas, silk, or bone. It came into use as a variety of watercolor (in combination with which it is often used), when artists added white paint to watercolor paints to achieve an opaque layer of paint. Gouache was widely used as early as the Middle Ages by artists of many European and Asian countries, mainly in book miniatures. During the Renaissance it was also used in sketches, cartoons, and the tinting of drawings, and later in portrait miniatures. In the 18th and early 19th century, some artists used gouache to paint miniatures (in Russia, F. P. Tolstoi). The beginning of factory production of special gouache paints in the mid-19th century helped to make gouache a technique apart from watercolor painting—distinguished from the latter by the denseness, lack of transparency, and opaqueness of its tones.

In Russia the gouache technique became highly developed in the late 19th and early 20th century in the work of V. A. Serov, A. Ia. Golovin. and S. V. Ivanov, who used it for large easel paintings, taking advantage of its opaqueness to achieve decorative effects. Today, gouache is used for posters, book and applied graphics, sketches of theater sets, and decorative designs.

REFERENCE

Kiplik, D. I. Tekhnika zhivopisi, 6th ed. Moscow-Leningrad. 1950.

A. S. ZAITSEV

gouache

1. A method of painting, using opaque pigments pulverized in water and mixed with gum.
2. A painting so made.
3. An opaque color used in the process.

gouache

1. a painting technique using opaque watercolour paint in which the pigments are bound with glue and the lighter tones contain white
2. the paint used in this technique
3. a painting done by this method
References in periodicals archive ?
Weise, an artist who lives outside Creswell, has nearly 30 works in the DIVA exhibit, including the pastels, some watercolors, a few gouaches and even some oil paintings, the latter a new direction for him.
The gouache colours, particularly the violets and magentas, are fugitive.
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Dozens of smaller gouaches offered these and other elements in slightly tamer combinations.
Yves Tanguy's tiny but perfectly formed gouache, Imaginary Landscape, is worth inspection and Phelan Gibb's Mother and Child (charcoal and gouache) exerts a strong appeal.
The full-page gouache pictures depict his mundane life, and each facing text page includes a portrait of a breed of chicken, images he creates but can't sell.
Designer's gouache was then used to color and paint their images.
The posters, which are not for sale, use a variety of techniques including gouache, montage and photography.
Changes include the addition of 175 full-color illustrations, and attention to opaque waterbased processes--acrylic, casein and gouache, and collage.
Gouache, president of BioTechnica, stated: ``With the successful sale of Scott Seeds, BioTechnica has completed a year-long business restructuring that began with the acquisition of a controlling interest by the Limagrain Group of France in March of 1994.
Her portraits of human-animal hybrids have a stiffness reminiscent of early New England portraiture, and her muted palette is accentuated by the choice of gouache and acrylic in preference to oil.
She uses water-soluble colored pencils and gouache and concludes by showing the viewer a number of completed paintings.