gourd


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gourd

(gôrd, go͝ord), common name for some members of the Cucurbitaceae, a family of plants whose range includes all tropical and subtropical areas and extends into the temperate zones. Almost all members of the family are annual herbs that grow as climbing or prostrate vines with spirally coiled tendrils. The characteristic large and fleshy fruit of many genera is often called a pepo; several genera have dry fruits, some with a single seed. The family is known for its many edible and otherwise useful plants. The name gourd is applied to those whose fruits have hard, durable shells used for ornament and as utensils, e.g., drinking cups, dippers, and bowls. The Old World genus Lagenaria includes the calabash, dipper, and bottle gourds. Luffa cylindrica is the loofah, dishcloth gourd, or vegetable sponge; when the edible fruit—called California okra in the S United States—is bleached dry, the inner fibrous network is used as a filter or a scrubbing sponge. Among the many other gourds are the serpent, or snake, gourd (Trichosanthes anguina) of Indomalaysia, whose slender fruit reaches 6 ft (1.8 m) in length. Many of the edible members of the family have been cultivated for so long—often since prehistoric times—that a single species may include several quite different varieties. Cucurbita includes the pumpkinpumpkin,
common name for the genus Cucurbita of the family Cucurbitaceae (gourd family), a group that includes the pumpkins and squashes—the names may be used interchangeably and without botanical distinction. C.
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, the vegetable marrow, and the summer squashes (all varieties of C. pepo); the winter squashes (varieties of C. maxima); and the crooknecks and the cheese pumpkin (varieties of C. moschata). Cucumis (see melonmelon,
fruit of Cucumis melo, a plant of the family Curcurbitaceae (gourd family) native to Asia and now cultivated extensively in warm regions. There are many varieties, differing in taste, color, and skin texture—e.g.
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) includes the cucumbers (C. sativus) and the gherkins (C. anguria); C. melo includes all melons except the watermelonwatermelon,
plant (Citrullus vulgaris) of the family Curcurbitaceae (gourd family) native to Africa and introduced to America by Africans transported as slaves. Watermelons are now extensively cultivated in the United States and are popular also in S Russia.
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, which, together with the citron, or preserving, melon, is Citrullis vulgaris. Of the few members of the family indigenous to the United States, the colocynth, or bitter-apple (Citrullis colocynthis), yields a powerful laxative from the dried pulp, and the wild balsam apple, or prickly cucumber (Echinocystis lobata), characteristically explodes when ripe, shooting out its seeds—as does the Mediterranean squirting cucumber (Ecballium elaterium). Bryony (two species of Bryonia), cultivated in Central Europe as a cover vine, has long been valued locally for the medicinal properties of its roots. The African genus Dendrosicyos is a unique member of the family in that it grows as a small, bushy tree. Gourds are classified in the division MagnoliophytaMagnoliophyta
, division of the plant kingdom consisting of those organisms commonly called the flowering plants, or angiosperms. The angiosperms have leaves, stems, and roots, and vascular, or conducting, tissue (xylem and phloem).
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, class Magnoliopsida, order Violales, family Cucurbitaceae.

Bibliography

See L. H. Bailey, The Garden of Gourds (1937); U.S. Dept. of Agriculture publications on melons and squash.

Gourd

 

the fruit of any one of several cultivated plants of the family Cucurbitaceae. Gourds include the cucumber, the musk-melon, the watermelon, and squashes. Among the squashes are the winter squash, the winter crookneck, and the pumpkin (whose varieties include the yellow-flowered gourd and the bush pumpkin). Gourds are cultivated in all continents between 60° N lat. and 35° S lat. In northern regions they are grown in green houses and hothouses.

gourd

1. the fruit of any of various cucurbitaceous or similar plants, esp the bottle gourd and some squashes, whose dried shells are used for ornament, drinking cups, etc.
2. any plant that bears this fruit
3. a bottle or flask made from the dried shell of the bottle gourd
References in periodicals archive ?
Vegetables like bottle gourd, cucumber, squash, pumpkin and melon are considered one of the healthiest vegetables but they can turn lethal, if bitter.
grandfather's farm and there was a dipper gourd, which was used as
They said 2530 C temperature was the best for proper germination of bitter gourd seed.
Recently, 59- year- old diabetic Sushil Kumar Saxena, a deputy secretary in the Council for Scientific and Industrial Research, died after he drank bottle gourd juice that was bitter.
The small "Tooters" are of the ocarina style and are made from some small decorative gourds.
At age 66, Ray astounds fine art collectors with exquisite designs that begin as a rustic, hard-shelled gourd.
This is because once the children saw the swan neck gourds, they instantly thought birds.
To attach the ribbon for hanging the gourds, place a small amount of hot glue on the base of the gourd's stem.
Cronin, is a collection of book reviews and articles which address Hurston's four novels, Jonah's Gourd Vine (1934), Their Eyes Were Watching God (1937), Moses, Man of the Mountain (1939), and Seraph on the Suwanee (1948); her autobiography Dust Tracks On a Road (1942); three collections of folklore, Mules and Men (1935), Tell My Horse (1938), and Sanctified Church (1983); the play Mule Bone (1991); and selected short stories from The Complete Stories (1995).
Further, Thomas' inclusion of Charles Chesnutt's tale "The Goophered Gourd Vine" (1887) challenges the expectation that speculative fiction must draw on hard science and technology.
AS AN EVENING COMMUTER BUS RUMbles over the red-earth sierra of Argentina's northeast province of Misiones, which is a thumb of land poking into Brazil and bordering Paraguay, a passenger stoops by the driver, reaches for a thermos mounted beneath the windshield and refills a palm-sized gourd with hot water.
In contrast, insects have to contact the cucurbitacin in buffalo gourd and the bitter melon before they feed on it.