governess

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governess

a woman teacher employed in a private household to teach and train the children
References in periodicals archive ?
When Miss Emmie was in Russia; English governesses before, during and after the October Revolution.
No wonder governesses in 18th- and 19th-century novels were so often cast as frustrated, bitter women forced onto life's sidelines.
The single plate and teacup on the table emphasise the lonely life of many governesses, in contrast to the children she teaches happily playing outside.
Jeanne Peterson, and Mary Poovey have explored the ways in which discussions concerning governesses, and their fictional representations, served to both reinforce and subvert Victorian assumptions about women's roles in the public and private spheres.
After a privileged childhood marked by a sophisticated education from European governesses, Karinska had two brief marriages before she fled the Bolsheviks and her native Russia forever in 1924 with her daughter Irene and nephew Lawrence Vlady in tow.
Having driven away four governesses in just a year, Louisa is not an easy charge.
The new Harlequin fiction line also returns the romance novel to its gentler roots, when governesses would look longingly across the room at noblemen or tycoons for most of the book and the tale would end with nothing more salacious than the characters rushing into each other's arms and saying, ``I love you.
There, in company with his numerous children, their French and German governesses, and distinguished writers and artists, Alexander created his own rural idyll.
From Cradle to Crown: British Nannies and Governesses at the World's Royal Courts.
Admittedly, there have been other great Hollywood governesses cut from the same lace: Joan Fontaine as Charlotte Bronte's Jane Eyre, Deborah Kerr as Anna in The King and I or as the mysterious Miss Madrigal in Chalk Garden.
Women's relationship to the home and to homelessness occupies the last third of this book; the essays demonstrate what this meant to Flora Tristan, the Saint-Simoniennes, domestic servants and governesses in literature.