governess

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governess

a woman teacher employed in a private household to teach and train the children
References in periodicals archive ?
While some women can have successful careers as governesses, Austen appears to be saying (through her different characterizations of Miss Fairfax and Miss Taylor) that Jane Fairfax does not have the makings a very good governess (West 34).
Thousands of English-speaking girls from the British Isles worked as governesses to upper-class Russian society before the Revolution.
Ol'ga Solodiankina's book, in contrast, explores domestic education and the influence of foreign governesses on pupils, as well as the experience of governesses in Russia.
Since Brandon tells her story by relying on the journals and diaries of six women who worked as governesses between 1750 and 1860, the sampling includes several extraordinarily gifted and resolute voices like the feminist Mary Wollstonecraft and her sisters.
The best known fictional governesses are Becky Sharp, in William Thackeray's Vanity Fair (1847), who rose in Regency society through her own energetic and amoral efforts, and Charlotte Bronte's Jane Eyre (1847).
The single plate and teacup on the table emphasise the lonely life of many governesses, in contrast to the children she teaches happily playing outside.
As if purposefully specifying how little of this meets the eye, the present governesses remarks, "Still, all this while, nothing more passed between us save that Flora had let her foolish fern again drop to the ground.
Jeanne Peterson, and Mary Poovey have explored the ways in which discussions concerning governesses, and their fictional representations, served to both reinforce and subvert Victorian assumptions about women's roles in the public and private spheres.
After a privileged childhood marked by a sophisticated education from European governesses, Karinska had two brief marriages before she fled the Bolsheviks and her native Russia forever in 1924 with her daughter Irene and nephew Lawrence Vlady in tow.
Having driven away four governesses in just a year, Louisa is not an easy charge.
The new Harlequin fiction line also returns the romance novel to its gentler roots, when governesses would look longingly across the room at noblemen or tycoons for most of the book and the tale would end with nothing more salacious than the characters rushing into each other's arms and saying, ``I love you.
Duplicitous, grotesque, alcoholic, foreign, and gender-ambivalent, the governesses that haunt his short stories, his best-known novel Uncle Silas (1864), and the lesser-known novel A Lost Name (1868) could be unrepressed ids of any number of their living and fictional contemporaries.