governor

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governor,

chief executive of a dependent or component unit in a political system. In the United States, a governor is the chief executive of each state and is elected by the people of the state. In the British, French, and Dutch empires a governor was traditionally appointed to rule over each of the colonies. Governors in the United States originally lacked much power. They were often subordinate to the state legislatures and had little control over administrative agencies. However, political reforms in the early 20th cent. shifted power from the legislative to the executive branches of state governments, and today governors are among the most powerful political figures in the United States. At the National Governors Conference, developed from a meeting called (1908) by President Theodore Roosevelt, the nation's governors meet annually to discuss common political and governmental problems.

governor,

automatic device used to regulate and control such variables as speed or pressure in the functioning of an engine or other machine. A governor may be an electric, hydraulic, or mechanical device, or it may employ some combination of electric, hydraulic, and mechanical components. The constant-speed governor serves to keep the speed of an engine constant under changes in load and other disturbances. It is very often a mechanical device, employing centrifugal force. Such a governor contains weights, called flyballs, each attached to the end of an arm. The arms are arranged, like the spokes of wheels, around a central spindle and are connected to the inlet valve (commonly called the governor valve). The flyballs are so attached that they move away from the spindle as the speed increases (decreasing the fuel or steam to the inlet) and come closer to the spindle as the speed decreases (increasing the fuel or steam), thereby keeping the speed constant. Varying degrees of closure and the speeds at which they are to occur can be set in advance. Where changes are required while an engine is in operation, a variable-speed governor is employed. A governor-synchronizing device is used to equalize the speed of two or more engines driving electric generators before they engage the generators. In order to control the speed of some engines, a governor's output must be strengthened by connecting the output to a hydraulic amplifier.

Governor

 

(1) In present-day bourgeois states, the highest official in a territorial unit. For example, in the USA a governor is the executive head of a state, popularly elected from among candidates nominated by the leading bourgeois parties. In Denmark each of the 25 districts is headed by a governor appointed by the king. In Great Britain a governor is an official appointed by the British government to administer a colony.

(2) In prerevolutionary Russia, the highest government official in a province, who performed administrative, police, and military functions.

governor

[′gəv·ə·nər]
(mechanical engineering)
A device, especially one actuated by the centrifugal force of whirling weights opposed by gravity or by springs, used to provide automatic control of speed or power of a prime mover.

governor

A type of control to ensure that certain types of equipment, like high-pressure fuel pumps, operate at the desired speed. A governor has a sensor to measure the speed, a datum from which the equipment speed is referenced, and a control to adjust the speed to align it with the datum. See overspeed governor.

governor

1. the ruler or chief magistrate of a colony, province, etc.
2. the representative of the Crown in a British colony
3. Brit the senior administrator or head of a society, prison, etc.
4. the chief executive of any state in the US
5. Engineering a device that controls the speed of an engine, esp by regulating the supply of fuel, etc., either to limit the maximum speed or to maintain a constant speed
References in periodicals archive ?
The historiographic tradition sees this first phase as also involving the division of the governorships into provinces (provintsii); the replacement of the old district voevodas by commandants (komendanty); the institution of landrikhter judges subordinated to the governors; the introduction of the land councillors, metropolitan nobles of stol'nik or lesser rank appointed by the Senate to sit in governorship chanceries as checks on gubernatorial abuse of authority; and, from 1715 on, the conversion of the land councillors into officials in charge of fiscal administration in the new tax-lot units that replaced the old districts.
Dmitrii Alekseevich Redin, Administrativnye struktury i biurokratiia Urala v epokhu petrovskikh reform (zapadnye uezdy Sibirskoi gubernii v 1711-1727) [The Administrative Structures and Bureaucracy of the Urals in the Age of the Petrine Reforms (the Western Districts of the Governorship of Siberia in 1711-27)].
In a presidential year, the presidency, one-third of the Senate, the entire House of Representatives, and eleven governorships are up for election.
In Reagan's second year, 1982, Republicans went from holding twenty-two governorships to holding sixteen, a reduction of 27%.
Republicans, in contrast, "get all excited about taking over the local water commission or the state assembly, or, God knows, the governorship.
But Republicans should be careful: Democrats won governorships in Illinois, Michigan, Pennsylvania, and Wisconsin, four states with lots of electoral votes.
Contrary to what some political pundits and talk show hosts claim, the Republicans did not lose seats in the House of Representatives or forfeit California's governorship because of their positions on ``the issues,'' that amorphous-sounding term so frequently used by television personalities.
Democratic candidates did, and that's why they picked up five seats in the House; re-elected a vulnerable incumbent senator, Barbara Boxer, despite extremely high negative ratings; picked up five seats in the state Assembly and two in the state Senate; and retook the California governorship for the first time in 16 years.
The ruling Peoples Democratic Party lost two states -- Ogun and Oyo -- to the opposition Action Congress of Nigeria in Tuesday s governorship elections, the reports said.
Conservative Republicans have figured out that governorships are where it's at.
The ruling party also stood a fair chance of losing two of six governorships Sunday - in the industrial northern state of Nuevo Leon and in central Queretaro.
With Republicans currently projected to win 10 governorships versus the Democrats' one in the states being polled, Democratic wins in both Colorado or Maryland will still result in a net loss for the Democrats on a state level.