gradation

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gradation:

see ablautablaut
[Ger.,=off-sound], in inflection, vowel variation (as in English sing, sang, sung, song) caused by former differences in syllabic accent. In a prehistoric period the corresponding inflected forms of the language (known through internal reconstruction) had
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.

Gradation

 

(The principle of biological perfection), a principle of the gradual development from the simple to the complex, based on the striving toward perfection found in living things; the principle was introduced by J. B. Lamarck in his theory of evolution.


Gradation

 

a stylistic device; a series of similar words or expressions (images, similes, metaphors, and so on) that gradually emphasize and increase or, on the other hand, decrease (climax and anticlimax, respectively) the sense or emotional significance. The principle of gradation may be the device in a verse composition (in lyric poetry—for example, “The east grew white ...” by F. I. Tiutchev) or plot composition (byliny [epic folk songs] or fairy tales—for example, The Little Tower Chamber). An example of stylistic climactic gradation is “I do not regret, I do not call, I do not cry” (S. A. Esenin).

gradation

[grā′dā·shən]
(geology)
The leveling of the land, or the bringing of a land surface or area to a uniform or nearly uniform grade or slope through erosion, transportation, and deposition.
Specifically, the bringing of a stream bed to a slope at which the water is just able to transport the material delivered to it.

particle-size distribution

A tabulation of the percentages of the various sizes of particles in a sample of soil or aggregate for concrete as determined by sieve analysis.

gradation

1. (in painting, drawing, or sculpture) transition from one colour, tone, or surface to another through a series of very slight changes
2. Geology the natural levelling of land as a result of the building up or wearing down of pre-existing formations
References in classic literature ?
Something I had said of him, when his name had been accidentally mentioned at dinner, remained in her memory, and led us, by perfectly natural gradations, into speaking of Mrs.
With time at her disposal, she would have taken him lightly in hand, and led him, by fine gradations, to the object in view.
These difficulties and objections may be classed under the following heads:- Firstly, why, if species have descended from other species by insensibly fine gradations, do we not everywhere see innumerable transitional forms?
Gradations in rank are much more strongly marked: the Guaso does not by any means consider every man his equal; and I was quite surprised to find that my companions did not like to eat at the same time with myself.
There Nature has woven a natural selvage, and the eye rises by just gradations from the low shrubs of the shore to the highest trees.
By fine gradations, the airy veil of morning thinned in substance as it rose--thinned, till there dawned through it in the first rays of sunlight the tall white sails of a Schooner Yacht.
Generally well himself, he could not realize that we sink to it by slow gradations.
Every elevation of the type 'man,'" he writes in "Beyond Good and Evil", "has hitherto been the work of an aristocratic society--and so will it always be--a society believing in a long scale of gradations of rank and differences of worth among human beings.
Delafield, perfectly master of his instrument and the music, fixed his eye on the countenance of Charlotte, and he experienced a thrill at his heart as he witnessed her lovely face smiling approbation, while his fingers glided over the flute with a rapidity and skill that produced an astonishing variety and gradation of sounds.
She threw herself into my arms the very first day, and I almost owed her a grudge for having deprived me of that pleasure of gradation, of carrying the defences, one by one, which is almost as great as that of entering the place.
The progress of the friendship between Catherine and Isabella was quick as its beginning had been warm, and they passed so rapidly through every gradation of increasing tenderness that there was shortly no fresh proof of it to be given to their friends or themselves.
Hence, complex monuments, edifices of gradation and transition.