gradation

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gradation:

see ablautablaut
[Ger.,=off-sound], in inflection, vowel variation (as in English sing, sang, sung, song) caused by former differences in syllabic accent. In a prehistoric period the corresponding inflected forms of the language (known through internal reconstruction) had
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.

Gradation

 

(The principle of biological perfection), a principle of the gradual development from the simple to the complex, based on the striving toward perfection found in living things; the principle was introduced by J. B. Lamarck in his theory of evolution.


Gradation

 

a stylistic device; a series of similar words or expressions (images, similes, metaphors, and so on) that gradually emphasize and increase or, on the other hand, decrease (climax and anticlimax, respectively) the sense or emotional significance. The principle of gradation may be the device in a verse composition (in lyric poetry—for example, “The east grew white ...” by F. I. Tiutchev) or plot composition (byliny [epic folk songs] or fairy tales—for example, The Little Tower Chamber). An example of stylistic climactic gradation is “I do not regret, I do not call, I do not cry” (S. A. Esenin).

gradation

[grā′dā·shən]
(geology)
The leveling of the land, or the bringing of a land surface or area to a uniform or nearly uniform grade or slope through erosion, transportation, and deposition.
Specifically, the bringing of a stream bed to a slope at which the water is just able to transport the material delivered to it.

particle-size distribution

A tabulation of the percentages of the various sizes of particles in a sample of soil or aggregate for concrete as determined by sieve analysis.

gradation

1. (in painting, drawing, or sculpture) transition from one colour, tone, or surface to another through a series of very slight changes
2. Geology the natural levelling of land as a result of the building up or wearing down of pre-existing formations
References in periodicals archive ?
The effect of the number of traverse lines on the accuracy of the chord length gradation curve was evaluated from graphs of the simulated volume of the air voids ([mm.
The number of traverse lines needed to accurately reflect the chord length index can be evaluated by computing the chord-length gradation curve for a varying number of lines.
This is illustrated by the differences in the air void and chord length gradation curves of Figure 1.
Different specimens will have different air void gradation curves.
In Figure 3, the gradation curve for an 8% volume fraction of air is skewed right, meaning the chord lengths measured from the traversing lines are predominantly of the smaller magnitude, with most of the air void volumes being less than 0.
With a left-skewed air void gradation curve (Figure 4), the chord length gradation curve shows a much greater difference than for the right-skewed distribution.
An Accurate Method of Constructing a Gradation Curve
Recognizing that direct use of the chord lengths provided poor estimates of the air void distribution and volume, a major objective was to develop a method that could accurately estimate the air void gradation curve from the chord length measurements.
From the sample measurements of the chord lengths, create a gradation curve which is presented in cumulative form.
Standardize the gradation curve of step 1 by dividing the length axis by the largest measured chord length, Lx.
Using the dimensionless chord length gradation curve of step 2, compute the mean, Lm, standard deviation [L.
c] of the beta distribution [8], which will serve as an approxi mation to the dimensionless chord length gradation curve: