grading curve

grading curve

A graphical representation of the proportions of different particle sizes in a material; obtained by plotting the cumulative or separate percentages of the material passing through sieves in which the aperture sizes form a given series.
References in periodicals archive ?
But there's another reason why many students don't graduate: the grading curve.
The benefits of this process are twofold: the producer secures new product offerings and reduces low-value product; and the customer has access to a secure supply of sand with a stable grading curve.
Earning 100 on her labs and understanding the class material, she was nevertheless earning C's and lower on tough exams with this forced grading curve.
Good customer service (keeping the consumer happy) may be achieved with a dose of familiar pedagogy, a touch of technological wizardry, a grading curve and minimal outside assignments, which may also result in positive feedback from the consumer on the final evaluation of services rendered: the teaching evaluation.
It's time to kill the grading curve, David Laude of the University of Texas at Austin argues.
The company's grades in this report were assigned on a grading curve, giving an A+ to the highest scoring companies and those with scores near it.
The companies' grades in this report were assigned on a grading curve, giving an A+ to the highest scoring companies and those with scores near it.
The company's grades were assigned on a grading curve, giving an A+ to the highest scoring company in each sector.
Apreso has a transformational effect on my students who've historically been in the bottom half of the Green Chemistry grading curve of 40% or less," said John Warner, director UMASS-Lowell Center for Green Chemistry.
example: while many schools specify grading curves, they seldom specify
As males' classroom performance dipped, grading curves declined, too, he said.