gramophone

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Related to gramophones: record player

gramophone

1. 
a. a device for reproducing the sounds stored on a record: now usually applied to the nearly obsolete type that uses a clockwork motor and acoustic horn
b. (as modifier): a gramophone record
2. the technique and practice of recording sound on disc
References in periodicals archive ?
The first spring-driven gramophone appeared in late 1896 and by the following year its popularity was beginning to overtake that of its predecessor, the phonograph which played small, tube-like cylinders.
S t r e a m Nostalgia Users can pair any Bluetooth-enabled device to the Gramovox(TM) Bluetooth Gramophone and wirelessly stream songs through the product.
dead," he claimed and took it upon himself to breathe new life into them by using them as a medium for works seeking the substance and patterns of commercial releasing of recordings, as well as by expressive playing on gramophones within the context of the New York underground No Wave scene, from which Swans, Sonic Youth, Lydia Lunch and Glenn Branca accured, as well as the contemporary reductionist improvisations
The gramophone was the obvious development, invented in 1888 by Emile Berliner, a German American, although it first appeared on the market as a toy.
UNDER HAMMER Old gramophones for sale by Anderson & Garland.
An Edison phonograph of 1905 was sold by retailer W Newton of Westgate Road, a Colombia gramophone of 1906 to Sherborne's of Westmorland Road and a 1940s Vidor wireless and gramophone to the Windows store.
On the other hand, it does mean that we're doing nothing to repair the damage caused by a century of gramophone turntables.
People are intrigued at what is involved, so rather than just listening to the music, many people like to watch the process of winding the gramophones, changing the needles and changing the records.
In Northampton today, phonographs and old wind-up gramophones are attracting enthusiasts from all over the country for the City of London Phonograph and Gramophone Society's Phonofair 2001.
It was perfectly usual and acceptable to have to wind up these gramophones between records, but to try to learn to dance to a machine that reduced a danceable tune like Cheek to Cheek or It's a Sin to Tell a Lie to a series of grunts and moans during the playing of one record was difficult if not hopeless.
Besides setting up to sell gramophones and records in North America, he gave the okay to William Barry Owen, an ex-lawyer with big ideas about the possibilities of the newfangled record business, to do business in Europe.