grasserie

grasserie

[′gras·ə·rē]
(invertebrate zoology)
A polyhedrosis disease of silkworms characterized by spotty yellowing of the skin and internal liquefaction. Also known as jaundice.
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45) The Breton magistrate, sociologist of law, and South American linguistics expert Raoul de la Grasserie (1839-1916) contradicted Roberty in maintaining that nations were now artificial, historically created races--a principal premise of his view that all truc nations deserved self-determination.
In the third discussion of this theme, at the Paris Societe de sociologie in April 1902, La Grasserie translated race as an "ethnic" quality anterior to society, necessary for "anthroposociological practice," a term used by Vacher de Lapouge.
La Grasserie postulated a pre-existing ethnic factor that could strongly affect adjustments to the milieu.
La Grasserie failed to criticize an American statistician's pessimism on educating African-Americans.
La Grasserie was not especially liberal either on race or gender issues.
But La Grasserie thought the rime for necessary housework implied limited working hours.
La Grasserie and Monin were examples of moderate conservatives who adhered to the older paradigms on both issues.
47) La Grasserie, " La race et le milieu," RIS, 10 (1902), pp.