gratuitous

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Related to gratuitousness: inconsiderate, multifariousness

gratuitous

Law given or made without receiving any value in return
References in periodicals archive ?
Decision making system To decide to purchase a tourist product through a travel agency, how much it matters to you: the individualisation of the tourist product 3,2 the diversity of the products 3,9 the price of the product 4,8 the promotions 3,8 the recommendations from relatives and friends 4,6 the reliability 4,4 the facilities and gratuitousness given 4,1 the originality of the product 3,6 Note: Table made from bar graph.
It paints its characters in broad, easy to recognize strokes, sets up its various conflicts, and then lets the gears of gratuitousness grind away.
Gratuitousness "fosters and disseminates solidarity and responsibility for justice and the common good among the different economic players.
To describe the realization of the freedom to act risks compromising the spark that ignites it, or in other terms, as Sartre put it: "we never speak of the gratuitousness of a work of art" (46).
By "absurdity" Sartre means the absolute gratuitousness of life.
And except for some full-frontal male nudity, which is hilarious for its gratuitousness - and wow, you will not see it coming - there's really no gross-out humor.
At what point does bold depiction of honest adult behavior stop and gratuitousness begin?
Toronto was good; Toronto was pleasant; but not until this building did it offer the inspiration that arises out of excess, out of the gratuitousness of imagination.
Crisp swam with the "antinomian undercurrent" that surfaced when Perkinsians strove to insulate the gratuitousness of the gospel against legalist incursion.
The Sea, moreover, is about grief and loss, the transience of human existence, the senselessness and gratuitousness of life; the novel offers a meditation on the indifference of the world, and it is about the supposed comfort of the past.
Racialization" is white agency, in other words, and some of the book's strongest points come in the third chapter's discussion of what Martinot calls "the gratuitousness of race and racialization that makes racism and white supremacy so impervious to reason, argument, or ethics (131).
One might cringe at such heavy handed touches as God's teardrop crashing to earth and causing the Temple to split in two or be appalled at the bloody gratuitousness of a bird plucking out the eyes of one of the thieves at Golgotha, but there are inspired moments too.