gratuity


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gratuity

a gift or reward, usually of money, for services rendered; tip
References in periodicals archive ?
38) By contrast, a gratuity is punishable by a maximum of only two years in prison, along with fines.
Multiplied by the number of weeks an officer works each year, the gratuity can easily surpass $100.
If this is the case, there is no immediate ethical difference between tasty food and food given as a gratuity, because they both work against the declared end of a need-based distribution.
For example, two major generals who are the highest-ranking members of the association, should by 2003 have been each entitled to $820,512 in salary, pension arrears and gratuity.
The British veterans have also been spurred into action by decisions in Canada and the Isle of Man to pay around 10,000 pounds ($15,000) in gratuity to their own veterans -- a sum, they too, are looking for.
s seeming attraction to process thought acknowledges its problems with the gratuity of grace and the sovereignly free God of Christian tradition.
For those on a limited contract, if the employee leaves voluntarily, then the employee will not be entitled to receive gratuity at all.
Gratuity funding, in which a company invests money to match its gratuity liabilities, can protect businesses in the event they are unable to fund their employees' end-of-service benefits.
At a time when employee retention is very high on the HR agenda, facilitating the opportunity for employees to save for their future, incorporating the end of service gratuity is a win-win situation.
It may also have the effect of inflating the ultimate end-of-service gratuity ('gratuity') entitlement.
The poll came after an 'Ask the Expert' column by UAE-based solicitor Nida Chaudry, who outlined the laws governing gratuity payments and how they should be calculated.
to, and penalties for the federal bribery (2) and illegal gratuity (3)