tumulus

(redirected from grave mound)
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Related to grave mound: burial mound

tumulus

(to͞o`myələs), plural tumuli (–lī), in archaeology, a heap of earth or stones placed over a grave. The terms moundmound,
prehistoric earthwork erected as a memorial or landmark over a burial place, a defensive embankment, or a site for ceremonial or religious rites or other functions.
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, barrowbarrow,
in archaeology, a burial mound. Earth and stone or timber are the usual construction materials; in parts of SE Asia stone and brick have entirely replaced earth. A barrow built primarily of stone is often called a cairn.
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, or cairncairn,
pile of stones, usually conical in shape, raised as a landmark or a memorial. In prehistoric times it was usually erected over a burial. A barrow is sometimes called a cairn.
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 are more common in modern usage.

tumulus

A mound of earth or stone protecting a tomb chamber or simple grave; a barrow, 2.

tumulus

Archaeol (no longer in technical usage) another word for barrow2
References in periodicals archive ?
Svipdagr seeks the help of his mother, Groa, at her grave mound, and she bestows upon him a number of charms to aid him in this journey, including one to calm magical storms at sea.
A food scientist by training - he was once technical director of 14 companies - Victor had his schooling in Cheltenham in the 1920s and it was observing stone circles and grave mounds during this period that sparked his interest in past civilisations.
You can go to places and see things - South Wales is littered with about 200 stones, dozens of grave mounds, tombs, all sorts of artefacts.
Topics include Viking warrior burials which may be the longphort, a group of Viking grave mounds and their conservation, a Viking-age story of old and new Dubliners in Ireland and Britain, the possibility of Dublin actually being a duet of Hiberno-Norse cities, a report from the Monasticon Hibernicum Project, a narrative of a guild merchant, a report of an Anglo-Norman excavation, a description of an early suburb, and information on investigating living standards.
Within it is a huge cemetery, containing thousands of small grave mounds.