grave

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grave,

space excavated in the earth or rock for the burial of a corpse. When a grave is marked by a protective or memorial structure it is often referred to as a tombtomb,
vault or chamber constructed either partly or entirely above ground as a place of interment. Although it is often used as a synonym for grave, the word is derived from the Greek tymbos [burial ground]. It may also designate a memorial shrine erected above a grave.
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. See burialburial,
disposal of a corpse in a grave or tomb. The first evidence of deliberate burial was found in European caves of the Paleolithic period. Prehistoric discoveries include both individual and communal burials, the latter indicating that pits or ossuaries were unsealed for
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; funeral customsfuneral customs,
rituals surrounding the death of a human being and the subsequent disposition of the corpse. Such rites may serve to mark the passage of a person from life into death, to secure the welfare of the dead, to comfort the living, and to protect the living from the
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.

What does it mean when you dream about a grave?

Graves often represent the end of the line, the end or “death” of something, rather than literal death. They also suggest grave issues that require depth of thought and contemplation before making a decision. Because of their underworld connotations, graves can indicate the realm of the unconscious. (See also Burial, Coffin, Crypt, Dead/Death, Hearse).

grave

1
(of colours) sober or dull

grave

2
Music to be performed in a solemn manner

Grave

(dreams)
Graves are generally depressing and represent some form of death. On a very physical level this dream does not appear to be a very happy omen. However, the dream could also have deeper and more spiritual meaning. It could represent things that require deep thinking and are not “on the surface.” Graves could also symbolize the unconscious. If someone close to you has recently died, it may be normal for you to have dreams about graveyards and death. However, if this dream is coming up and there has been no death in the family, consider your feelings in daily life. If you are feeling depressed or helpless in any way, “look inside” and make attempts to increase your self-awareness and your spiritual identity.
References in periodicals archive ?
Despite the dangers of the job, the gravediggers keep climbing over, under and through the decaying mechanical giants because they know their mission is supporting a much larger one.
According to the gravedigger, the price comprises a digging fee of 150,000 rupiah, a land price of 350,000 rupiah, and 700,000 rupiah for the tombstone.
One of his worst jobs during this time was working as a gravedigger in Greenford, West London.
Chris Gregory, from Berwick in Northumberland, was one of two gravediggers dismissed by Northumberland County Council amid fears of burials in the wrong grave, the wrong memorial being on a grave, and problems with record keeping.
Ross used to be a gravedigger for Dumfries and Galloway Council.
There have also been many famous gravediggers who went on to other careers - Rod Stewart, Joe Strummer from The Clash and Dave Vanian from The Damned.
FUN: Kitty Wilkinson (aka Chris Ford) shows pupils from Crosby and Wigan round Liverpool Cathedral, while, below and right, Victorian gravedigger Richie Baker tells ghost stories
Our first responders include a Presbyterian minister, a gravedigger, a snake expert and a ladies darts international.
There are lots of village suspects, including a local politician, his patrician mother, an 86-year-old gravedigger, a former catering co-worker, and Kimberly's biological but anonymous father.
According to the record books Frank Cook's career has included being a gravedigger, gardener, postman, brewery hand, schoolmaster, remedial teacher, a cost engineer and a project manager.
Or he reproduces the minute descriptions of the wardrobes of the weaver Mangold, who wore a respectable brown coat, and the gravedigger Laichinger, who wore a more modest gray one, but who, along with his wife, had some items in festive red that suggested a certain disregard of formal convention.
The story is glimpsed as a shifting fabric, with, for example, Ophelia identified with Gertrude, and the Gravedigger and Yorick conceived as one character.