gravid

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gravid

[′grav·əd]
(zoology)
Of the uterus, containing a fetus.
Pertaining to female animals when carrying young or eggs.
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References in periodicals archive ?
For every 1-cm increase in maternal height, birth weight increased 17 g (95% CI, 4-30 g) after controlling for stove type, gravidity, maternal diastolic blood pressure, and season of birth.
2) years (range 47 - 68 years) and the mean gravidity and parity were 3.
We considered the following potential covariates: age at ultrasound, age at explosion, age at menarche, menarche status at explosion, marital status, parity, gravidity, age at last birth, lactation history, current body mass index (BMI), smoking, and education.
Differences between groups in gravidity, maternal age, and gestational age were statistically different but not clinically significant.
However, other characteristics caused unavoidable heterogeneity among the 13 pools, including mean age of mothers, gravidity, household income, and educational attainment (Table 2).
The investigators retrospectively studied eight randomized, controlled trials, each involving between 259 and 2,340 women of any age or gravidity.
The maternal and gestational ages of the women studied were similar in both groups, but gravidity and parity were higher among the non-ART women.
Confounders included gravidity, parity, age at first pregnancy, age at last pregnancy, lactation, family history of breast cancer, age at menarche, current body mass index, oral contraceptive use, menarcheal status at explosion, menopause status at diagnosis, weight, height, smoking, and alcohol consumption.
All the cesarean sections were performed under regional anesthesia and the groups were similar in terms of gravidity parity indications for C-section, gestational age, and C-section history.
There were no significant differences in age, gravidity, parity, or body mass index between the groups who had the sling removed and those who did not.
Overall, the risk of ovarian cancer was reduced by about 40% among oral contraceptive users compared with non-users after adjusting for age, gravidity, family history of ovarian cancer, and race.